► “Hermes & Writing in Ancient Greece”: “Collaboration with Alan Severs”✍️.-

This is a reblog from La Audacia de Aquiles by Aquileana in collaboration with Alan Severs posted on May 29th. The article adeptly weaves the similarities between the Egyptian, Greek, and Norse gods together who equate writing with magic. Many of the concepts in the ancient civilizations are relevant today and modern day religions. Who would have thought that replacing oral traditions with memory would be so controversial. Yet now, computers are replacing traditional writing. Enjoy the informative and thought-provoking post.

La Audacia de Aquiles

► “Hermes & Writing in Ancient Greece”: “Collaboration with Alan Severs”✍️:

Statue of Hermes/Mercury. Roman copy. 200 AD.


Summary:

“Hermes”, by W. B. Richmond. From “The magazine of art” vol. 9, 1886.

♠Divided into three sections, this article revolves around three main themes: Hermes, as The Greek God of Writing and his equivalents in other cultures; Plato´s derogatory ideas of writing, amidst the prevailing Oral Tradition; and how this eventually would change, as writing became a most accepted form, when the Greeks adopted the Phoenician Alphabet.

Greek God Hermes was the equivalent of the egyptian God Thoth, and from both of them resulted a Hybrid God: Hermes Trismegistus.

Hermes´roman counterpart was Mercury

In Norse Mythology, his Homologous figure was Odin.

Hermes and his associated figures are described in the first section.

♠The second section refers to Plato´s dialogue “Phaedrus”,

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