Warning: don’t mess with the fairer sex!

The following is a reblog of an article entitled, Warning: don’t mess with the fairer sex!” posted by Luciana Cavallaro on March 12, 2018. It is a fascinating overview of the unique history of Island of Hephaistos/Hephaestus, today known as Limnos/Lemnos. There are tales that a matriarchal society inhabited the island and archaeologists have found evidence on the island of a possible connection to the Amazons from Scythia. Fascinating read!

Eternal Atlantis

Our next destination has a unique history, and perhaps the earliest forerunner of women’s liberation. Then again, what happened may raise a few brows and possibly considered extreme as to the outcome. We are off to the Island of Hephaistos/Hephaestus, today known as Limnos/Lemnos. It is one of the northern islands of Greece and not far from the Hellespont, the Dardenelles in Turkey, the famous trade route between the west and east, and also where Troy was situated.

From Google maps

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Celebrate New Apple Awards Apollo’s Raven

Sorcery? Mythology? Forbidden love? An ancient...... review gif

Dual New Apple Book Awards

I am honored that Apollo’s Raven has been chosen as the “Official Selection” in the Cross Genre category in the 2017 New Apple Annual Book Awards!  This award is in addition to the 2017 New Apple Summer E-Book Awards for which Apollo’s Raven was chosen as the “Official Section” in the Historical Fiction category.

New Apple e-book Award

New Apple Book Award

Celebrate Awards & Republication 

I am pleased to announce the e-book and softcover book of Apollo’s Raven have been republished. Revisions were based on feedback I received from reviewers regarding word choice and inconsistencies. Quotes within the book have been deleted at the beginning of each chapter.

As an author, I value readers’ reviews and constructive feedback, as this helps me to write quality books that each of you can enjoy. Feel free to contact me if you have any feedback or questions. A major twist in Empire’s Anvil is based on a question that a reader asked me: What happens to the soul of a person who is possessed by another soul?

More to come!

To celebrate the New Apple book awards, the republished e-book of Apollo’s Raven will be offered at Amazon for the Bargain price of 99 cents through February 23rd. Click on the following to purchase:

The softcover book of Apollo’s Raven on which the New Apple Award is based is also available at Amazon. Also check out the audio-book of Apollo’s Raven that is available at Audible and Apple Store. The narrator, Kristen James, did an amazing job narrating the book.

Kristin James, Narrator of Apollo’s Raven

Future Giveaways

As a preferred e-mail subscriber, you will be eligible to win monthly giveaways beginning in March 2018 through the Fall. The giveaway will be announced each month and could include an Amazon gift card, signed hardcover special edition or e-book of Apollo’s Raven, or an advanced copy of Empire’s Anvil (anticipated summer 2018).

Book Cover Empire’s Anvil

The March 2018 Giveaway will be a signed copy of the special hardcover edition of Apollo’s Raven.

Photographs of Readers with Apollo’s Raven Book

For those who have bought the Apollo’s Raven book, send me a photograph of yourself holding the book at  linnea@linneatanner.com. Indicate what city you are from, and I’ll post the photograph on my website.

Below are some recent photographs, including Joni’s cat that loves to sleep next to the Apollo’s Raven book.

Joni’s Cat with Apollo’s Raven





Donna Cordova with Apollo’s Raven

Lewis Bustos with Apollo’s Raven









Thank you for your continued support!

As always, I appreciate your support and would love to hear from you.

Best wishes,
Linnea Tanner


Uvi Poznansky, Author of A Favorite Son

A Favorite Son by Uvi Poznansky Audio-book Review

A Favorite Son by Uvi Poznansky Audio-Book Review


Below is my Goodreads review of the audio-book, A Favorite Son, written by Uvi Poznansky. The availability of books in audio formatting is gaining popularity. Oral traditions have historically conveyed stories from one generation to another. The combination of the prose and the skill of the narrator to bring the story to life adds another dimension to the reading experience.

Thus, when I review an audio-book, I not only evaluate how engaging and well-written the story is, but also listen for the narrator’s ability to interpret the story. I particularly enjoyed the audio-book, A Favorite Son, because the prose was so beautifully written, and the narrator David Kudler added an emotional resonance to the bible story of Jacob and Esau.

Goodreads Review


A Favorite SonA Favorite Son by Uvi Poznansky
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A Favorite Son, written by Uvi Poznansky and narrated by David Kudler, retells the biblical story of Jacob and Esau. The tale is told from Jacob’s point of view which a modern audience can relate to. As an older man, Jacob tried to explain why he stole his older brother’s inheritance as he recounts his youth. Author Poznansky masterfully characterizes Jacob as an intelligent and self-reflective man who deeply regrets tricking his older twin, Esau, into exchanging his inheritance for a savory stew. The most poignant scene is when Jacob’s mother, Rachel, convinces Jacob to deceive his blind father, Isaac, into believing he is Esau. In doing so, Jacob steals his older brother’s blessing and subsequently the entire inheritance. This is a moral tale of the consequences of a parent favoring one child over another and pitting one against another to gain a father’s blessing as a favorite son. I highly recommend the audio-book because David Kudler delivers a heart-wrenching performance that capture Jacob’s sorrow and guilt as he narrates the story.

View all my reviews

The Dying Gaul

The Dying Gaul is a reblog posted by An Archaeologist’s Diary on January 21, 2018. I’ve always been fascinated with this statue as it is a poignant reflection of a brave Celtic warrior who has fallen in battle and is facing death. What struck me is how the Greeks and Romans respected the noble Celtic warrior who demonstrated courage in defeat and when faced with his mortality.

Hope you enjoy!

An Archaeologist's Diary

Let’s see if I can produce ARCHAEO-Crush posts on a monthly basis in 2018.  The ancient work of art I am presenting in January is a spectacular marble sculpture in the collections of the Musei Capitolini.


Type: artefact (sculpture)
Civilisation: Ancient Rome
Date: 1st or 2nd century C.E.

ARCHAEO-Crush: The statue of the Dying Gaul (or more precisely, the Dying Galatian) is an ancient marble masterpiece at the Musei Capitolini. Discovered in Rome, the statue was found in the gardens of the Villa Ludovisi (possibly during excavations for the foundations between 1621 and 1623), when the villa was built on the site of the landscaped gardens of the Roman historian Sallust, who acquired the land after the death of its previous owner, Julius Caesar.  When discovered, the man in the sculpture was identified as a wounded or dying gladiator because a bleeding wound can clearly…

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►Tarot: “Most Relevant Generalities / Major Arcana”🗝️.-

This is a reblog of Tarot: “Most Relevant Generalities / Major Arcana”🗝️. posted on 01/15/2018 by Aquileana. This article resonated with me because symbols used in Tarot cards have universal meanings in mythology, religion, and psychology (dreams) across the world. Tarot cards do not predict the future but opens up the realm of possibilities with issues at hand.

Hope you enjoy!

La Audacia de Aquiles


“Most Relevant Generalities / Major Arcana” 🗝️:

The twenty-two cards of the Arcana Major. Tarot deck: Rider,Waite & Smith.

Introduction and Sketch of this Post:

This is the first post of  the series on “Tarot”. 

Firstly, in section 1), I´ll present an overview of the story of Tarot, its use for divination purposes, tarot spreads, cards´positions (upright or reversed), total number of cards, division into two categories: Major and Minor Arcana.

In the second section (2) of this post, I´ll assess in-depth the Major Arcana. 

For that purpose, I´ll use the classic Rider-Waite deck, illustrated by Pamela Colman-Smith, which has been continually printed since 1909. Hence, it is easy to find in Bookstores or online nowadays.

Let´s keep in mind that the Major Arcana cards are somehow related to Carl Jung’s archetypes. They are “patterns”, inherent part of the Collective Unconscious. These cards symbolise the process…

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Exploring Magical Powers of the Celts

Exploring Magical Powers of the Celts

Summoning Celtic Magical Powers

Female Warrior Summoning Celtic Magical Powers

Contributed Post

The post, Exploring Magical Powers of the Celts, was contributed by Jane Johnson, a freelance writer and editor. She has written for both digital and print across a wide variety of fields. Her main interest is exploring how people can improve their health and well being in their everyday life. And when she isn’t writing, Jane can often be found with her nose in a good book, at the gym or just spending quality time with her family.


Overview of the Celts

The earliest pre-Christian Celts were mysterious and captivating pre-Christian individuals with a history filled with legends and romance – a history of wizards, fairies, wizards, heroes and above all, magic. Julius Caesar was once quoted as saying that the Celts were brave but impetuous and headstrong. The various clans migrated from Central Europe and went on to populate much of Western Europe, Ireland and Britain until they were ultimately displaced by first the Romans and later Christianity.

Statue of Dying Celt

The various Celtic clans and tribes were unified by their common priesthood known as the Druids who were said to possess magical powers. These Druid priests preserved religion, scholarship, science and law, and had supreme influence over everyone due to their sacred authority. The Druids were known to yield psychic abilities firmly yet responsibly. One of the most famous of Celtic legends involving Druids is that of King Arthur and the wizard Merlin. Merlin was a Druid wizard, bard, tutor and keeper of arcane secrets. He was also rumored to be the son of an incubus (demon) and a mortal woman who was first a princess and later became a nun.

Druidic Ritual at Stonehenge

Druid Magic

The ancient Druids were also clergy as well as Shamans with their costumes including long white robes, feathered capes and elaborate headdresses. They also would often be seen wielding a rowan wood scepter as a sign of their power and that was often used as a magic wand when performing spells. The magic of Druids is all dependent on a strong and healthy awareness of nature itself as well as the gods and spirits who dwell in nature and is deeply rooted in the four elements earth, air, water and fire. Most Druid spells correspond to one or more of the elements with the 4 compass points each displaying a significant corresponding color:  North-black, South-white, East-red, West-grey.  Druid magic was known to combine the four natural elements with magic stones, color, direction, the lunar calendar and incense.

Horn God Surrounded by Animals; Inner Panel Gundestrup Cauldron

Sacred Symbols

Birds such as the swan, goose, owl, raven and eagle were all considered sacred in Celtic culture.  Other sacred animals included the cat, dog, wolf, bull, stag, boar, horse and butterfly with these animals often being depicted in very complex knotted patterns.


Knotted Celtic Raven Symbol


The number 3 was also considered sacred to the Druids and was believed to have numerous magical powers. This belief is exemplified in the Celtic triquerta, trefoil, nonegram and the Triangle of Manifestation. Hallowed trees included the hazel, oak and yew, with the worship of the oak tree being very commonplace in both Celtic and non-Celtic Europe.


Cork Oak Tree in Southern Britain


The Little People

Dwarfs, Brownies, Elves and Fairies made up a very intriguing aspect of Celtic culture and folklore. These tiny life-forms were seen as spiritual beings to whom the imprudence of mankind has assigned an imaginary existence. Fairies were referred to as the ‘good neighbours’ and were beautiful miniature versions of a divine human form. These cheeky little beings resided below ground or in little green dwellings and wore the most brilliant clothes. Leprechauns have become the self-appointed guardians of ancient treasure burying it in pots or crocks. Their association with rainbows and finding the pot of gold at the end of it has forever been associated with prosperity.

Classic representation fairy with butterfly wings by painter Ricardo Falero

Healing powers

The esteemed Druids were the learned elite and the authority on just about everything including medicine and healing spells. Healing magic would often involve invoking a deity of health and healing such as Airmid (Irish), Diancecht (Irish), Meg the Healer (Scottish) or Ariadne (Welsh) to help heal the ill. Astrology and astronomy were also used extensively while making a medical diagnosis. The Celts worshipped the moon and the sun and had a rudimentary veneration of the closest planets in the solar system. Various plants and herbs were employed for medicinal purposes and often had associations with certain Celtic deities.

Wildflowers on Dover Cliffs, Kent

The beauty and history of Celtic culture and magic have been preserved in various customs, legends, music, art, antiquities and literature for everyone to explore and enjoy. Through the continued study and appreciation of the magic and myth of the legendary Celtic culture, we are able to fully enjoy and treasure the influence of the most captivating of all people, the Celts.

Upcoming Posts

Upcoming posts based on my research to support the Apollo’s Raven series and another novel under development about a shipwrecked Roman tribune serving under Germanicus are as follows:

  • Celtic Goddesses
  • Mark Antony
  • Annihilation of Roman Legions in Germania and Aftermath

Linus Treefoot Author Interview

Linus Treefoot Author Interview


It is my pleasure to introduce Linus Treefoot, the debut author of Bright Moon Ridge. The book is a 2017 Apple Summer e-book Award Winner: Runner-up in the Historical Fiction category. Linus was born in the United States, but has lived most of his adult life in New Zealand. He has a fascinating life journey in which he has extensively researched and traveled to China in preparation for his debut novel.

Linus Treefoot graciously accepted my invitation to interview.  Below is his biography, responses to my interview questions, and ways you can contact him. Click on the book cover below to purchase his book at Amazon.

Bright Moon Ridge Book Cover


Linus Treefoot is an American who has lived in New Zealand for 47 years. He graduated from Stanford University in 1968, then spent about 10 years doing carpentry and farm work, traveling and having a good time. For many years he was a part time entertainer, playing guitar and singing solo or in bands. He has been a primary school and English (ESOL) teacher for about 35 years. He is married to a Chinese woman who grew up in the People’s Republic of China. They have two adult children. When he doesn’t have to work, his interests are music, reading, learning Chinese, swimming and hiking.

Interview Linus Treefoot

Would you provide an overview of the newest book that you have released in 2017?

Bright Moon Ridge is the story of a 19-year-old male, Johnny Bartooth, who is given a journal which was written by his father many years before. His father went to China in 1980 to find his mother, marry her and bring her to the USA. No one whom Johnny knows ever heard from either of them since.

Johnny’s curiosity is ignited and he resolves to go to China to search for his mother and father. Most of the book is about this search for a family he never had.

What or who inspired you to become a writer?

No person in particular. From high school on, I enjoyed expressing myself through writing – at first through poetry and songs more than any other genre.

What inspired you to write Bright Moon Ridge about a young man’s search for his missing parents in China?  

My first motivation was to record and fictionalize my life as a hippy in the hills of California and in the backwaters of New Zealand in the 1970s – some outrageous stories and eccentric characters. The germ of the story of Bright Moon Ridge came when in 1990 I met a guy who had just returned from China; he told me that he had had a stealthy affair with a married woman doctor. I expanded on his story in my imagination and intertwined it with those stories I had been considering for years based on my wild life as a hippy. Through many stages of rewriting and editing, the hippy stories were deleted in order to have a more cohesive novel.

How much research was involved in writing your book? How did you go about it?

In 1990 also I met and married my lovely wife, Ma Yue Ying, who grew up during the Cultural Revolution; tales from her own and her family’s history were put into the mix. I developed a strong interest in Chinese history and culture, and began to blend political and historical elements into the story. I did a considerable amount of research through reading and through travelling in China, including two trips to Hainan Island. My wife helped a great deal in translating conversations and some books written in Chinese. Writing this novel was an obsessively absorbing task for me.

How often do your characters surprise you by doing or saying something totally unexpected?

They don’t usually act outside of what I consider their temperament and personality, but sometimes do uncharacteristic things. For example, gentle Mei, when attacked by her fellow prisoners, eventually strikes out in a surprisingly violent way

Have you received reactions/feedback to your work that has surprised you? In what way?

The reviews have been consistently very positive, which has been an encouraging and pleasant result.

Do you have any other books planned?  If so, would you give an overview of what the book(s) are about?

In the short term, no. But I think I have at least one more novel in me. There is all the material that I deleted from my original drafts of the novel.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

Probably being chosen to work as an English teacher in Massey University. It was a major goal of mine for more than 10 years previous. That was the best job I ever had; I worked there for more than 15 years.

What are the most important traits you look for in a friend?

Kindness is to me the most valued trait. I also highly appreciate a good sense of humour (translated: someone who laughs at my jokes) and I appreciate someone who can converse about politics and literature.

If you could have one skill that you don’t currently have, what would it be?

Being able to play the piano very skillfully.

What might we be surprised to learn about you?

I left the USA when I was 24 in protest over the Vietnam war and the way the government worked. I was almost ecstatic to arrive in relatively backward New Zealand where – without having any friends or acquaintances — I enthusiastically began a new life.

What makes you laugh?

A punch line that is completely different from what you’d expect, e.g. “If you give a man a fish, he will escape hunger for one day. But if you teach a man how to fish, he will sit in a boat all day and drink beer.” Or alternatively, a joke or story in which the teller pretends to be exceedingly stupid, e.g. “Do you know about the tick inspector? If a man comes to your door and says he is a tick inspector and asks you to take off all your clothes and turn around and around, don’t do it! He’s not the real Tick Inspector…. I only wish someone had told me before.”

What simple pleasure makes you smile?

Walking through the bush and looking at the trees and patterns of sun and shade.

You can contact Linus Treefoot as follows:


Bright Moon Ridge can be purchased at AMAZON.