The Labyrinthine Journey Infographic

Eternal Atlantis

To introduce my new blog series, I’ve created an infographic. Thought it was time to do something different to present information. The infographic outlines Book 2 in the Servant of the Gods series and of the various places the reluctant hero Evan and his companions journey.

I quite like infographics, and the easy way information is presented. Though I must admit there’s nothing easy about designing and creating an infographic, unless you use a template.

View original post 33 more words

Author Interview Paul Schumacher

INTRODUCTION

It is my pleasure to introduce Paul Schumacher, Colorado author of the debut novel, The Tattered Box. I first met Paul a couple years ago in a writing workshop sponsored by the Northern Colorado Writers and was moved by his heartfelt and poignant writing style in another story.

During the day, he works as an electrical engineer and at night, fits his writing into an active lifestyle with his wife, three children, and two cats. I’m honored that I had an opportunity to learn more about Paul and the background to his debut novel. Below is my interview of Paul.

Paul Schumacher Head Shot

Paul Schumacher, Author, The Tattered Box

INTERVIEW

Tell me about your latest book, The Tattered Box.

It’s a story about a grandson who travels back in time to hang out with his grandpa. Initially, he’s doubtful of his grandpa’s never-ending stories, and frankly doesn’t even believe some of them happened. But then he’s granted this wonderful opportunity to experience them firsthand. Through his experiences, he learns to love and appreciate his grandpa for who he really is. Much of the story is told through innocent items in a raggedy old box from his grandpa.

What inspired you to write a story about the relationship between a grandfather and grandson and the memories they share? Are these characters based on people you know?

The day before my father-in-law passed away, I was taking my then 13-year-old son to school. We were reminiscing about his grandpa, and he said something that really struck me. He wondered how cool it would be to somehow go back in time and hang out with his grandpa. Not only was his grandpa a fun-loving storyteller, he also loved his sports: baseball, bowling, golf, or anything with a ball. My son figured they’d be the best of friends, if only he was somehow granted that wish. Writing this book was one way to fulfill that.

Once I heard my son’s comment and started crafting a storyline in my head, I was hooked. I simply had to share it with the world. I started writing down many of my father-in-law’s stories and eventually fashioned them into a complete novel. Thus much of the book is based on real events. It became a not-so-gentle reminder to me (and hopefully others who read it) that time is short, and I need to learn to better appreciate my fleeting moments with others. Make the most of life! We never know how much time we have left.

Is there a special item in the tattered box that evoked a personal memory for you?

Probably the muddy ball. The story of the ball, which is told in the first chapter, is based almost entirely on a true story that I heard many times from my father-in-law. Every time I read that chapter, it’s like he’s sitting next to me telling me the story. The elaborate hand motions, the strong fluctuations in his voice, the glimmer in his eye as he reveals the punchline. I can see it all.

Have you received reactions/feedback to your work that has surprised you? In what way?

I’ve heard so many wonderful stories from people who reminisce about their own grandparents. Most have such wonderful memories of getting to know loved ones who lived in an entirely different era. Like a complex jigsaw puzzle, attempting to decipher the life and times of someone you barely relate to. Many also had regrets: if only they’d asked more questions. If only they’d spent more time with them.

Specifically, one of my favorite feedbacks was from someone who had an elderly parent who lived far away. As she finished the book, she felt inspired to fly out and visit with her ailing father. Spending time with him while she still could. I felt honored that I played a role in that.

Are you currently working on another book? What are your projects for the near future?

My second novel is a story of secrets and redemption. The working title is I Wish I Had Known and is partly based on some of my own life experiences. It’s about a teenager who mentors some boys younger than him, and he also falls in love with a young woman along the way. But there’s a darker side. He needs to learn to forgive the drunk driver who killed his father, and others need to forgive him for his past missteps. I continued with the inter-generational aspect of The Tattered Box that I find so fascinating. I guarantee you’ll love the ending!

Are you an avid reader? Which books are your favorite ones? Which books inspire you?

I’ve always loved reading, and my list of books is always quite diverse. I read everything from classics to murder mysteries to Christian non-fiction. Lots of topics can capture my attention, and I always enjoy learning from the opinions and writings of others. As far as favorite books, the two that come to mind are A Prayer for Owen Meany and The Jesus I Never Knew. I laugh as I write this as those two books alone are very different, but they have both taught me (in their own unique way) to be a better person and writer.

What is your life like outside of writing?

My family is very important to me. We spend a lot of time doing fun stuff like golf, tennis, watching movies, playing games, or just hanging out. Of course, like all modern families, my kids are involved in their fair share of activities and sports, and I play the role of the proud spectator. My life isn’t about me, and I’m perfectly fine with that. I also fit in work when I can to pay for it all. I’m an electrical engineer by day, husband, father, and author by night.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

This might sound funny, but the first one that comes to mind was a sand wedge I received from my brother when I was a teenager. He filled a shoe box with sand, placed a ball on top, and included a ‘coupon’ for a sand wedge which I desperately wanted at the time. Maybe it was its uniqueness or its presentation, but that Christmas was one of my favorites.

What might we be surprised to know about you?

I certainly don’t look like one, but I used to be an avid runner. I actually completed a marathon a long time ago, a badge of honor I’m darn proud of. I also used to bike a lot, and finished eight MS 150 bike tours (yes, they’re 150 miles).

What simple pleasure makes you smile?

Writing. In my sunroom, on my deck, in a coffee shop. Wherever I find inspiration, that’s where I am. Writing is such a creative process and is such a dramatic shift from the analytical tasks I perform at work. A blank page with no rules on what to say next is pretty exciting to me.

CONTACT PAUL SCHUMACHER

You can contact Paul at the following sites:

Twitter
Facebook
Goodreads

You can purchase his printed book and e-book at Amazon

Q & A with Linnea Tanner

Introduction

It is with great pleasure to share my interview with Luciana Cavallero, an Australian Author and Historian, that was recently posted on her website. If you click below, you will find out more about what inspired me to write Apollo’s Raven.

Q & A with Linnea Tanner

Come and meet Linnea Tanner in an interview about her debut book Apollo’s Raven. In her novel, Linnea Tanner weaves Celtic tales of love, magic, adventure, betrayal and intrigue into historical fiction set in Ancient Rome and Britannia. (Click here to go to the interview)

Colloration D.N. Frost Fantasy Author

Collaboration D.N. Frost Fantasy Author

Introduction

It is with great pleasure that I again introduce D.N. Frost, an exciting fantasy author with whom I’ve collaborated and shared my passion for Celtic mythology and traditions. I encourage everyone to learn more about D.N. and her epic saga Tales of the Known World published by TotKW books.

D. N. has twice been a guest blogger on my website. I was delighted on how she wove the meaning of the symbols of Celtic Tarot cards into some of the imagery I used in my book (Apollo’s Raven available April 10th). She recently re-posted these articles on her website which I encourage you to read:

http://www.dnfrost.com/2017/03/celtic-tarot-card-meanings-inspired.html

http://www.dnfrost.com/2017/03/celtic-tarot-cards-meaning-from-nature.html

Multi-talents of D. N. Frost

During our collaboration on the guest blogs, I learned of D.N. Frost’s other talents as a world builder and cartographer. She generates maps of new and past worlds that you can preview at her website:

http://www.dnfrost.com/2015/06/maps-of-known-world-resource-directory.html.

I asked D.N. to generate maps of Britannia, the Roman name for the United Kingdom. Below is the map of Britannia that she created. It provides a visual image of where the Celtic tribal kingdoms were located in 1st Century AD Britannia.

Map of Britannia Created by D.N. Frost

Collaboration on Apollo’s Raven

The backdrop for Book 1: Apollo’s Raven is in 24 AD southeast Britannia. D.N. Frost generated the map below of this region that was included in Apollo’s Raven to help readers visualize where the story takes place.

Map of southeast Britannia provided in Apollo’s Raven

Historical Backdrop to Apollo’s Raven

Southeast Britannia evolved differently than Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. After Julius Caesar’s military expeditions to the region in 55 – 54 BC, Rome strongly influenced the internal politics and trading of southeast Britannia. Many of the rulers in southeast Britannia were educated in Rome as hostages and adopted the empire’s taste for luxuries. Several powerful Celtic kings expanded their territories by conquering other tribes. There are written accounts that pro-Roman Celtic rulers pleaded for Rome’s help to intervene on their behalf.

Cunobelin, the king of the Catuvellauni, overtook the Trinovantes about 9 AD. He established his capital at Camulodunon (modern day Colchester). Recent archaeological evidence supports there was a Roman military presence before 43 A.D. that protected areas of Britannia vital to trading with the empire. This historical background sets the stage for the Apollo’s Raven series spanning from 24 AD to 40 AD.

I greatly appreciate D.N. Frost’s collaboration for creating the map of southeast Britannia that inspires the world-building for Book 1: Apollo’s Raven. 

Future Updates

More information about Apollo’s Raven can be found at http://amzn.to/2m17UJU. In the future, I’ll be providing updates on the release of the book, new posts on my blogs highlighting my research and other authors, and upcoming events.

Thank you for your continued support. Have a wonderful day!

Interview Anne Frandi-Coory

Anne Frandi-Coory, Author of Whatever Happened to Ishtar?

Introduction to Anne Frandi-Coory

It was my pleasure to interview Anne Frandi-Coory. She is the Australian author of the moving memoir: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR?

The memoir is about Anne’s quest for coming to terms with her traumatic childhood when she lived in a Catholic orphanage and later in her father’s family household. This is also a fascinating journey of Anne’s Italian and Lebanese heritages which provide insight into generations of defeated mothers.

I was first intrigued with the title because Ishtar is a goddess revered for many qualities in ancient civilizations. This book touched my heart as it addressed universal issues that impact women today.

Read my review of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR (5 of 5 stars) on APOLLO’S RAVEN:  http://www.linneatanner.com/blog/3614-2/

Book Cover: Whatever Happened to Ishtar_Cover_Anne Frandi-Coory_Ishtar


Interview with Anne Frandi-Coory

What was the defining moment that inspired you to write your memoir?

Anne:

There was no defining moment as such; more a series of events over a long period of time. The continued feedback from my extended Lebanese family that I was ‘backward’ – a label I overheard often throughout my childhood had always left me feeling devastated and depressed. I desperately wanted people to know that I was intelligent, that childhood emotional and psychological trauma didn’t equate to ‘backward’. I tried many times, as a young mother, to communicate with my Lebanese family, but I could barely utter a word, while they continually talked down to me.

On another level, I found it difficult to talk about my childhood, and as a result my children didn’t know anything about my life, or that of my parents. I wanted them to be proud of me. I felt I didn’t have a past, a family history, and I wanted them to have one.

What was the inspiration for the title of your unique book title, WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR?

Anne:

I was brought up as a strict Catholic as were most of my Lebanese and Italian relatives and ancestors. I discovered during my research that the women in my family tree suffered terribly at the hands of their men and the Church…too many children, too much abuse and the constant praying that in reality achieved nothing. My extensive reading about ancient goddesses like Ishtar informed me that women were once worshipped for their fertility, but weren’t solely defined by it. Ishtar occupied the highest position in the Babylonian pantheon; she was the favourite goddess of the Babylonians. She was the goddess of fertility, justice, healing and war. However, once the three patriarchal religions of Islam, Judaism and Christianity rampaged across humanity that changed forever. Christian women were then expected to emulate Immaculate Mary, mother of God, an impossible task. In the Catholic system, females had two vocational choices; become a mother (married of course) or a nun! Disastrously, my mother became both.

Statue of Ishtar

Statue of Ishtar

Was there any aspect of your Catholic upbringing that still deeply impacts you today?

Anne:

Yes. Fear and hypocrisy. I was so terrorised by stories of the devil and the tortures of hell all through my childhood while incarcerated in Catholic institutions, that most nights I experienced the most horrific nightmares that left me with a racing heart that seemed to shake my whole body. I sometimes imagined I could see the devil watching me in a corner of the room, so my reaction was to hide under my blankets praying that God would save me. The adrenaline rush prevented me from sleeping. I am still afraid of the dark, and although I no longer believe in the devil or hell, I suffer severe panic attacks if my fragile feelings of security and well-being are undermined in any way. Deep down, I have this feeling that at any time, everything I have will be taken from me, including my family.

The belief that anyone who was a good practicing Catholic was automatically a virtual saint, came crashing down around me when I discovered, as a teenager, that they were human like everyone else and just as capable of committing ‘sins’! I remember being utterly devastated but from that moment, slowly over time, my belief in God fizzled out and died. I am now an atheist.

What would you consider some of your most enlightening moments in your research that helped you come to terms with your childhood?

Anne:

I was explaining to a psychologist that I believed I had paid for my mother’s sins. He was silent for a few moments, and then said: “That’s a very interesting choice of words”. We talked about why I believed my mother had sinned. After a couple more sessions, he said to me “Do you think it possible that your Catholic upbringing may have done more harm than the abuse you suffered at the hands of your family?”

All through my research, I kept thinking about the psychologist’s words, and as a result, I wrote a very different book.

I had come to realise that my mother wasn’t a sinner, and that the story of my childhood was merely a tiny inset in a very large picture. That’s why, although I began writing my memoir, I ended up writing an extensive family history spanning generations and countries. That in general, life favoured males over females. With the change in perspective also came acceptance of my traumatic childhood.

Was there a woman in your ancestral history who most sparked your interest and why?

Anne:

Probably Italia Frandi, my great aunt. She died long before I was born, but I was given a recorded interview with her daughter, in which she talks about Italia’s life and achievements. Italia suffered many tragedies in her life but she never let that prevent her from becoming an astute business woman who wasn’t afraid to stand up to the Catholic Church or a legal system that favoured men.

Based on your experience, what advice would you give young women today?

Anne:

Three pieces of advice:

Feel the fear, and do it anyway. I know that’s a well-worn cliché, but I know it’s the best way to combat fear. I would still be hiding behind locked doors if I hadn’t ignored my fears and taken the plunge into unknown waters. It made me more courageous each time I achieved a goal.

If people make you feel uncomfortable or unhappy, move on. Listen to what your senses are telling you. Life is too short and there is so much you can achieve in your lifetime if you travel without negativity weighing you down. I believe this philosophy has kept me physically safe and mentally healthy. 

Always strive to be financially independent…It will empower you to be in control of your life.

Do you plan to write any further books based on the research you’ve done on your Lebanese and Italian heritages?

No, but I have written a series of poems, short stories in themselves, about aspects of my childhood, cultural and family history. I have painted an image for each poem, or attached a photograph. I have also written a few ancestral short stories. I am planning to publish these in a book sometime within the next year, once I complete the series.

Biography Anne Frandi-Coory

Anne Frandi-Coory was abandoned by her Italian mother when she was ten months old and placed in the care of the Catholic Sisters of mercy in Dunedin, by her Lebanese father. All through her childhood, Anne’s Lebanese extended family, and her strict Catholic upbringing, influenced her to believe that her life of abuse and gross neglect was  because she was “paying for my mother’s sins”. Anne married very young and had four children. After they had left home, Anne decided to research her family history  to try and understand the reasons why there were so many defeated mothers in her family tree. Over a period of fifteen years, she traveled across the globe, sourcedoriginal documents and interviewed many  family members, both Lebanese and Italian. Most of the  women were devout Catholics, forced to marry brutal and uneducated men and subsequently gave birth to too many children. Seemingly, the women’s sole reason for living was to breed, pray to God for help, attend Mass regularly, and hope that the after- life would reward them for their ‘goodness’. Catholic girls had one other choice for a vocation and that was to become a nun. This had not always been females’ lot in life. Ishtar, the pagan goddess of fertility, love and war, empowered females to emulate her prowess for thousands of years. But patriarchal Christianity usurped Ishtar with its Virgin Mary, and females were stigmatised as whore or venerated as virgin/mother.

Anne Frandi-Coory now lives in Melbourne, Australia with her partner. She works from her home studio as a painter, poet and short story writer. She intends to publish a book of her works.


Further Information:

Order WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR?:

Author Website Autographed Memoir: http://frandi.wordpress.com/buy-a-signed-copy-of-whatever-happened-to-ishtar-directly-from-the-author/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Whatever-Happened-Ishtar-Anne-Frandi-Coory/dp/1921642955

Customer Reviews: 

https://frandi.wordpress.com/category/latest-book-reviews-for-whatever-happened-to-ishtar/

Follow Anne Frandi-Coory:

Website:  https://frandi.wordpress.com/

Twitter:         https://twitter.com/afcoory

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Frandini/

Book Review: Whatever Happened to Ishtar?

Whatever Happened to Ishtar?Whatever Happened to Ishtar? Anne Frandi-Coory
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I follow Anne Frandi-Coory and signed up to receive notifications from her website frandi.wordpress.com to learn more about her Lebanese and Italian heritage. My curiosity aroused, I ordered  a signed copy of her memoir directly from her site and was deeply moved by it. Below is my book review.

GOODREADS BOOK REVIEW

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR? (Australian author Anne Frandi-Coory) is a beautifully written and haunting memoir of a woman who finds herself by exploring her family’s heritage that contributed to her growing up without the love and nurture of a mother she most desperately wanted. What first attracted me to this book was the title, WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR? The Ancient Sumerian Mother Goddess Ishtar celebrates love, fertility, and sexuality. This title haunted me as I read the memoir because Anne’s mother, like many woman of her generation and previous generations, was harshly judged for her sexuality and had limited options to treat her mental illness and to fulfill her potential. The first part of the memoir is Anne’s account of her childhood while the second part provides a historical account of her Lebanese (father’s side) and Italian heritage (mother’s side).

Anne was institutionalized at the Mercy Orphanage of the Poor at South Dunedin in her early childhood. At the time, her father could not adequately care for Anne after he divorced her mother for infidelity. At the age of eight, Anne was removed from the orphanage and introduced to the real world under the care of her father’s family. However, they shamed Anne and associated her with her mentally ill mother they considered a whore. This part of the memoir is gut-wrenching and haunting because Anne had to overcome loneliness and self-doubt to find her full potential after marrying, having four children, and finding her life partner after a divorce.

However, what is most fascinating is the rich heritage and ancestral genealogy of both her father and mother to understand what nineteenth century immigrants to Australia faced. With no access to birth control, women faced multiple pregnancies or secretly resorted to self-induced abortions with crude knitting needles. The historical accounts that Anne researched help explain why her father and her mother were compelled to make their choices. I recommend this memoir because the story will stay in your memory as it covers universal issues of female sexuality, women’s roles and options, mental illness, and society’s harsh judgment that has defeated mothers for generations.

View all my reviews

Interview Skadi Winter, Author, Malin and the Wolf Children

Skadi Winter at Book Signing

Skadi Winter at Book Signing

Introduction Skadi Winter

It was my pleasure to interview Skadi Winter, an exciting author of MALIN AND THE WOLF CHILDREN. This is a story about a young German girl, Malin, who must survive alone in war-ravaged Germany and Poland in 1945. It is a journey of a young girl’s soul-searching for love and understanding to survive a time of violence, hatred, and prejudice to learn that even wars cannot change the eternal rules of crime and retribution.

Skadi developed a passion for learning languages and travelling at an early age, and read her first book at the age of five—the stories of Wilhelm Busch. She worked as a medical secretary in different sectors of the health service in Germany and England for over thirty years. Like many women of her generation, following dreams was more often not possible due to financial and personal circumstances and prejudice against a gender. Skadi is a grandmother of ten lovely grandchildren from mothers of four different nations. She is a storyteller that believes in the richness of prose and subtle poetry of words. She has completed another novel, Hexe.

I reviewed MALIN AND THE WOLF CHILDREN and gave it 5 stars. Not only is it thought-provoking story about a young girl’s journey of finding meaning in life during time of war, it is a beautifully written book that is rich in prose and symbolism.

Skadiwinter

 

Read my review on Apollo’s Raven: https://apollosraven.wordpress.com/2015/11/17/book-review-malin-and-the-wolf-people-by-skadi-winter/


Interview Skadi Winter

What was your inspiration for telling the story of Malin, a young orphaned girl in war-torn Germany during World War II?

Skadi:

When I grew up in a very little village near the French border during the early 1950ies, refugees from Eastern Europe settled at the outskirts of it. Those people were ‘outsiders’ and conspicuously watched by the natives; they had to live with jealousy and racism, were extremely poor as they had lost everything during their flight from the East. The worst thing was, they were Roman Catholics in a pure protestant community. Outcasts from a world then unknown to me. They spoke differently, dressed differently and seemed to be ashamed and hurt. They were my first encounter with people ‘from another, strange world’ to me. The more hurtful comments I heard about them, the more grew my interest in them. It still pains me thinking of their children whom I went to school with. I still can feel their loneliness, fear and irritation.

Is the reference to Wolf Children in your story from actual historical accounts of orphaned children who were forced to survive in the countryside during World War II? Although Malin is German, do the Wolf Children consist of all nationalities of orphaned children?

Skadi:

Later on in life, I stumbled across accounts of former Wolf Children when I met the sister of my mum’s second husband. Their family originated from Eastern Prussia. This was the first time I’ve actually heard of Wolf Children when this lady spoke about their flight from Eastern Prussia and children she had met. They all had been ethnic German children whose homes and land had been confiscated by Poland and Russia and on the long trek, through cruel circumstances, had lost their families, either through persecution, illness, hunger, cold and murder during their flight.

One of the most fascinating aspects of this story is how Malin tries to understand the calamity around her by reflecting back to tales told by her grandmother about Ancient gods and goddesses? What was your intention for including these ancient tales in this story?

Skadi:

Children often retreat into their own world of phantasy when they are unable to fathom the grown-up world around them.  During those hard times in post-2nd WW Germany, children more often had to deal with day-to-day life on their own as mothers and fathers (if there were any fathers left) mostly had been pre-occupied to survive hunger, homelessness, their own experiences with the atrocities of war. Children were lucky if they had grandmothers, often a central figure in their lives, caring for them. I always felt and feel deep sorry for a world where grandmothers don’t seem to have a place in life any more. As I see myself today, my heart and soul developed during those times nourished by my grandmother; she was the one listening and responding with love to my questions and fears. I think, children and grandmothers have a special relationship due to both being not (yet/any more) productive in society. Children as innocent learners, grandmothers as a source of life’s wisdom and beyond.

The other characters that Malin meets on her journey reminds me of ancient mythology where a hero / heroine must survive a succession of trials. On the journey, Malin accepts help from other people who may become as evil as the vengeful soldiers stomping through the countryside. One of these characters is Lubina? Was she intended to be the alter-ego of who Malin might become if she does not learn how to renew her life from destruction?

Skadi:

Ancient mythology has a source. As have ancient folk tales. Humankind always had to live with destruction, evil and good. Each destruction in life eventually leads to re-construction and this is my point. If we do not, or are not willing to learn from the past, eventually the same mistakes will be made. It seems to me that this is what life is all about: to make the right choice where it matters. In this sense, yes, Lubina was intended to be the alter-ego of Malin.

Another quality that I enjoyed in your book was the symbolism of animals in the story.  Would you provide an overview of the symbolism of the hare, crow and wolf?

Skadi:

The Wolf, a fearless predator, who sometimes kills more than he can eat.  A warrior who, if approached with respect and knowledge, can turn into a pet dog.  A pack animal, loyal, caring, protecting, nourishing, at the same time cruel in his persuasion. A fascinating animal, symbolizing man.

The Hares, born fully furred and with open eyes, can fend for themselves from shortly after birth. They live alone, their mothers only ‘visiting’ them until they are weaned. They don’t mate for life. They are promiscuous. They go crazy during spring equinox. They live in one area, usually all their life, seemingly bound to their land, at the same time free in spirit.

The crow, divine providence, wisdom. A mythical bird throughout most of the cultures of the world. Harbinger of death. Messenger of the Gods. A symbol of recreation.

Though your book describes the horrors of war, I was inspired by your theme of documenting memories through oral and written traditions so that future generations can learn from the past. Is there more you would like to add about your philosophy of story-telling of bringing hope to future generations?

 Skadi: 

Oral and written traditions are important, yet in our times more and more neglected and ignored, even laughed at. The people of ancient times drew their wisdom and knowledge from them and passed them on for future generations to learn, to be inspired and to prevent them from making the same mistakes over and over again.

Ancient myths formed our society as it is today. History of mankind started with tales being told. Words are the most powerful instruments of humans which differ us from the rest of animals. At the same time, the ability of making use of words has made us arrogant, god-like. I truly believe, there is magic in words.

Stories need to be told, by all of us. Traditions have to be passed on the same as myths. Grandmothers are a source of wisdom for future generations. I am writing because I believe, stories and tales, myths, magic, words are the most important tools to teach, to create, to nourish one’s soul, to inspire and to give hope. We are not alone, words connect us to each other.

 Do you have any other books or projects  underway that you would like the readers to be aware of?

 Skadi:

Oh yes. I am writing on a sequel to Malin and Hexe.  It might sound unusual as their stories are not directly connected but, both are based on one subject: How wars, political and social circumstances affect children’s souls throughout all times. There is a burning passion in me to write stories to give a voice to suffering and growing from it. I’d like to revive the old tales and ancient myths because they are there for a reason. If only to help us to survive, to give hope and make us understand the complexity of our history, leaving the actual facts to the historians. My intention is to look beyond the facts, to grasp the myths and pass the essence on. After all, meanwhile I’m a grandmother of 10 grandchildren J. They are my inspiration.

It has been a great pleasure to do this interview with you and that you and your books are a great inspiration to me, as a writer and a woman.

 

Further Information:

Order MALIN AND THE WOLF CHILDREN:   http://www.amazon.com/Malin-Wolf-Children-Skadi-Winter/dp/1496999851

Customer Reviews MALIN AND THE WOLF CHILDREN: http://www.amazon.com/Malin-Wolf-Children-Skadi-Winter/dp/1496999851


Follow Skadi Winter:

Website: http://skadiwinterlive.wordpress.com/

Goodreads:  http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7240407.Skadi_Winter

Twitter:        https://twitter.com/skadiwinter1

Facebook:  http://facebook.com/skadiwinterwriter