Book Review The Labyrinthine Journey

The Labyrinthine Journey by Luciana Cavallaro My rating: 5 of 5 stars

In sixth century BCE, the modern day hero and time traveler, Evan, continues his quest to recover three relics of the Mother Goddess, so that the new Christian religion does not obliterate the worship of the Olympian gods. The Labyrinthine Journey, the 2nd book in the Servant of the Gods series by Luciana Cavallaro, has an epic mythological quality similar to Ulysses in Homer’s Odyssey.

Evan, also referred as Evandros, embodies Joseph Campbell’s archetypal hero found in world mythologies. In Book 1, Evan reluctantly accepts the call by his father Zeus to travel back in time from 21st Century to Ancient Greece, so he can use his skills, insight, and knowledge to recover the first relic, the golden serpent.

In the Labyrinthine Journey, Evan embraces his leadership role and commands a group consisting of a Phoenician, a Sicilian boy, Atlanteans, and a High Priestess who are also on the quest with him. He learns from the Oracle of Delphi that he can find the two remaining relics in the Minotaur’s labyrinth. The journey to recover these relics is fraught with dangers from hostile armies, Titans seeking to thwart Zeus, and mythological creatures such as harpies, a hydra, and a sea monster. Evans meets Jason of the Argonauts and Plato who both help him on his quest. The odyssey culminates in a cliffhanger where Evan must face his greatest obstacle that threatens to obstruct his goal of retrieving the relics.

Luciana has masterfully crafted a story that weaves mythology into the backdrop of historical events. The action scenes are riveting, particularly toward the end of the book. One of the aspects I liked most about the novel is the vivid, sensory description of each of the locations. As with any myth, The Labyrinthine Journey is more than what you see on the surface. It is an exploration of how humankind adopts religion to meet their needs and to help them define their culture. Evan’s modern day perceptions are challenged by the ancient traditions. He must adapt to these ancient beliefs to survive. Ultimately, it is a universal story of a hero’s journey into his soul and the wisdom he gains by meeting the various challenges.

I highly recommend this book for readers who love adventure, historical fiction, and mythology.

View all my reviews

The Labyrinthine Journey Available April 1

Exciting news! Australian Author Luciana Cavallaro is releasing The Labyrinthine Journey at 99 cents on October 1st.

 

eBooks can be purchased from: Amazon

For all other eBook formats: Smashwords

 

 

 

 

 

If you haven’t already joined Luciana Cavallero’s Facebook event, click VIRTUAL BOOK LAUNCH PARTY and join in the fun from around the world.

Chance to Win Prizes. Giveaways. Meet New Friends!

Join other authors of historical fiction and historical fantasy from around the globe. Check out the time when each author will be on Facebook helping Luciana launch her 2nd book in the Servant of the Gods series.

I’ll be on line at 7:00 p.m. Colorado time Oct 1st [9:00 a.m. Oct 2nd Perth Australia; 3:00 a.m. Oct 2nd London; 9:00 p.m. Oct 1  USA Eastern].

Follow Modern-Day Hero on The Labyrinthine Journey

Follow the modern-day hero and time traveler, Evan, as he continues his odyssey as Servant of the Gods in The Labyrinthine Journey. The quest to locate the sacred object adds pressure to the uneasy alliance between Evan and the Atlanteans. His inability to accept the world he’s in, and his constant battle with Zeus, both threaten to derail the expedition and his life.

Traversing the mountainous terrain of the Peloponnese and Corinthian Gulf to the centre of the spiritual world, Evan meets with Pythia, Oracle of Delphi. Her cryptic prophecy reveals much more than he expected; something that changes his concept of the ancient world and his former way of life.

Will Evan and his friends succeed in their quest to find the relics and stop the advent of Christianity?

Meet Luciana Cavallaro 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical fiction novelist and a secondary teacher, Luciana Cavallaro, likes to meander between contemporary life to the realms of mythology and history. Luciana has always been interested in Mythology and Ancient History but her passion wasn’t realised until seeing the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. From then on, she was inspired to write Historical Fantasy.

She has spent many lessons promoting literature and the merits of ancient history. Today, you will still find Luciana in the classroom, teaching ancient history and promoting literature. To keep up-to-date with her ramblings, ahem, that is meaningful discourse, subscribe to her mailing list at luccav.com.

JOIN THE CELEBRATION AT LUCIANA CAVALARRO’S  VIRTUAL BOOK LAUNCH PARTY!

Architectural genius

The following is a fascinating post on the ongoing series of the Minoans by Luciana Cavallaro from her website Eternal Atlantis. I was amazed to learn of the Minoan’s architectural advancement to rival modern times, including pipes to bring in water and to dispose of sewage. Also of interest is the mythology of Theseus and the Minotaur that arose during this time.

Please enjoy!

Luciana Cavallaro

The Palace of Knossos would have to be one of the most amazing ancient sites I was fortunate to see. Built around 2000 BCE, and the largest of structures on Crete, it was the main power and pivotal centre of Minoan culture. The first palaces (Knossos, Mallia, Phaistos, Hagia Triada and Zakro) were destroyed by an earthquake circa 1730 BCE and rebuilt around 1650 BCE. The palaces withstood a series of earthquakes, and it wasn’t until the cataclysmic volcanic eruption at Thera and subsequent invasion of the Mycenaeans, that saw the demise of these extraordinary people and culture.

Map courtesy of: Go Greece Your Way http://gogreeceyourway.gr/traveling-in-greece/touring-in-crete/ierapetra-and-ancient-gournia/ Map courtesy of: Go Greece Your Way
http://gogreeceyourway.gr/traveling-in-greece/touring-in-crete/ierapetra-and-ancient-gournia/

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Minoan chronology

This is a reblog from one of my favorite websites ETERNAL ATLANTIS by Author Luciana Cavallaro. The post entitled, “Minoan chronology,” is from an ongoing series on the highly advanced Ancient Minoans; posted on MARCH 18, 2016 / CAV12

Enjoy!

Luciana Cavallaro

Determining a chronology for the Minoans was somewhat problematic as the script they left behind—Linear A—was and still is indecipherable. There was archaeological evidence to suggest Crete was occupied as early as the 7th millennium BC and bones of Neolithic inhabitation has been found. In order to establish a framework as to the development of the Minoans, Sir Arthur Evans, archaeologist and excavator of Knossos, used hand-made pottery to create a timeline. He divided the pottery into three eras based on the stylistic changes.  This technique has enabled archaeologists and historians calculate the progress of all civilisations.

By Evans, Arthur, Sir (1851-1941) - Evans, Arthur, Sir. Scripta Minoa : the written documents of Minoan Crete, with special reference to the archives of Knossos (1909), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4494576 By Evans, Arthur, Sir (1851-1941) – Evans, Arthur, Sir. Scripta Minoa : the written documents of Minoan Crete, with special reference to the archives of Knossos (1909), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4494576

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Symbols of Minoan Culture

The following is a reblog from ETERNAL ATLANTIS on the continuing series of the Ancient Minoan Society. This post is entitled, “Symbols of Minoan Culture,” that was posted on FEBRUARY 26, 2016 / CAV12

There were a number of significant symbols the Minoans used in their rituals and way of life. These symbols were not unique to the Minoans, but have been cross-culturally as representative of the Mother or Earth Goddess.

Enjoy the fascinating and informative post.

Luciana Cavallaro

There were a number of distinctive symbols the Minoans cultivated that had significant importance in their rituals and way of life. These distinguishing elements were not unique to the Minoans, which distinguished historians have identified were more cross-cultural, much like the representation of the Mother or Earth Goddess. The origins and similar features are evident (see article by J. Alexander MacGillivray) yet the purpose of the Minoan symbols evolved according to their needs and religious tenets. The main icons were the labrys, the bull horns, bees, and snakes.

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