THE AGE OF ARTHUR, PART NINETEEN: TRIUMPH AT BADON

The following is a reblog of THE AGE OF ARTHUR, PART NINETEEN: TRIUMPH AT BADON Posted on March 2, 2021 by barrycjacobsen at the website The Deadliest Blogger: Military History Page. This is a recount of THE BATTLE OF BADON HILL in which King Arthur had to race to the south to counter the Anglo-Saxons.

This is Part 19 of an ongoing series about 5th century Britain, unique among the territories of the Western Roman Empire that succeeded in holding back and even reversing the tide of Germanic conquest for nearly two centuries. This was an age of heroes… It was the Age of Arthur!
The series covers Britain in the 5th through the mid-6th Century A.D. It is a fascinating period, with the Classical civilization of Greece and Rome which gave way to the Germanic “Dark Ages”; the sunset of Celtic-Roman culture in Britain.

The Deadliest Blogger: Military History Page

 

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Unique among the territories of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century, Britain succeeded in holding back and even reversing the tide of Germanic conquest for nearly two centuries. This was an age of heroes… It was the Age of Arthur!

This is the Nineteenth-part of our discussion of Britain in the 5th though the mid-6th Century A.D. It is a fascinating period, with the Classical civilization of Greece and Rome giving way to the Germanic “Dark Ages”; the sunset of Celtic-Roman culture in Britain.

(Read Part Eighteen here. Or start from the beginning, with Part One!)

ARTHUR RETURNS SOUTH

Geoffrey of Monmouth states that Arthur was in the north, at Alclud, subduing the “Scots and Picts”. Alclud is obviously Alt Clut, the original name for Dumbarton Rock,  the chief stronghold of Strathclyde. This meshes well with the scenario described here previously, in which…

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Welcome to Day 8 of #RRBC’S ’20 WC&BE SPONSORS BLOG TOUR! @RRBC_Org @linneatanner @RRBC_RWISA @Tweets4RWISA

It is my pleasure to reblog a post hosted by Author Susanne Leist about my first book, Apollo’s Raven, in The Curse of Clansmen and Kings Series as part of the #RRBC’S ’20 WC&BE SPONSORS BLOG TOUR! Be sure to check out other amazing authors on this blog tour at: https://ravereviewsbookclub.wordpress.com/2021/04/12/welcome-to-the-20-wcbe-sponsors-blog-tour/

SUSANNE LEIST

2021 WRITERS’ CONFERENCE & BOOK EXPO!

Title of book

Apollo’s Raven

Book cover

Book blurb

A Celtic warrior princess is torn between her forbidden love for the enemy and duty to her people.

AWARD-WINNING APOLLO’S RAVEN sweeps you into an epic Celtic tale of forbidden love, mythological adventure, and political intrigue in Ancient Rome and Britannia. In 24 AD British kings hand-picked by Rome to rule are fighting each other for power. King Amren’s former queen, a powerful Druid, has cast a curse that Blood Wolf and the Raven will rise and destroy him. The king’s daughter, Catrin, learns to her dismay that she is the Raven and her banished half-brother is Blood Wolf. Trained as a warrior, Catrin must find a way to break the curse, but she is torn between her forbidden love for her father’s enemy, Marcellus, and loyalty to her people. She must summon the magic…

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Five Trees Featured in Celtic Lore

The following is a reblog from UNDER THE INFLUENCE! that was posted by ZTEVETEVANS on APRIL 7, 2021. The article entitled, “Five Trees Featured in Celtic Lore” is based on the Celtic belief that all objects have consciousness of some kind, which included trees. Each species of tree had different properties which might be medicinal, spiritual, or symbolic. Wood from trees could be used for everyday needs such as firewood for heating and cooking, and lumber to make shelters, spears, arrows, staffs and many other items. Trees supplied nuts and fruit for people and animals to eat. Five species of trees playing an important role in Celtic myths, legends, and folklore are discussed in this article.

Under the influence!

Image by mbll from Pixabay

This article was first published on 21st January 2021 on #FolkloreThursday.com under the title Top 5 Trees in Celtic Mythology, Legend and Folklore by zteve t evans.

Animists

It is believed that the ancient Celtic people were animists who considered all objects to have consciousness of some kind. This included trees, and each species of tree had different properties which might be medicinal, spiritual or symbolic. Of course, wood was also used for everyday needs such as fire wood and making shelters, spears, arrows, staffs and many other items. Trees also supplied nuts and berries for themselves and their animals as food. Some species of tree featured in stories from their myths, legends and folklore and presented here are five trees that played an important role in these tales and lore.

Oak Trees

The oak was the king of the forest having many associations throughout…

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Influential Women: Enheduanna – High-Priestess, Astronomer, First Known Author

The following is a reblog of a post entitled, “Influential Women: Enheduanna – High-Priestess, Astronomer, First Known Author” that was published by JULY 29, 2020 BY ZTEVETEVANS. It is fascinating to learn about the ancient influential woman who lived almost 4300 years ago in 2300 BC.

Under the influence!

File:Disk of Enheduanna.JPG from Wikimedia Commons – Author: Mefman00CC0

Daughter of Sargon

The world’s first known author is widely attributed to have been the daughter of Sargon (1) of Akkad in the 23rd century BC. We know her today as Enheduanna, which may have been a title of office, in which case her real name is unknown. She was the High Priestess of Nanna-Suen, a moon deity of Mesopotamia presiding over his temple complex in the city of Ur. The “En” part of her name signifies “leadership” and “ heduanna,” means “Ornament of Heaven” reflecting the divinity she served.

Clearly, she was of very high status in the society of her time and her writing was greatly influential then and in later times. Considerable parts of her work still exist in her original poetic form which has been influential in various religious systems throughout history.

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Welsh Mythology: Pwyll’s Sojourn in Annwfn

This is a reblog of a post entitled, Welsh Mythology: Pwyll’s Sojourn in Annwfn,” that was published on JUNE 24, 2020 by ZTEVETEVANS. It is an amazing tale of friendship and the honor that kings showed each other when they exchanged bodies and returned to each other’s homelands.

Under the influence!

Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

Presented here is a retelling of the story of the time Pwyll of Dyfed spent in Annwfn in the body of Arawn. It is the first part of the story of Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed or Pwyll Pendefig Dyfed, which is the First Branch of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi. It tells how he and Arawn became friends and of his sojourn in Annwfn.

Pwyll of Dyfed

One day as Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed was out hunting in the region of Glyn Cuch his hounds raised a stag. The stag took off at great speed with the hounds hard on its trail and Pwyll spurred his horse forward in pursuit sounding his hunting horn. The stag was moving fast but the hounds were keeping up and he was keeping up with the hounds. In the speed and excitement of the chase…

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Amulet’s Rapture

It is my pleasure to reblog the 5-star review by Literary Titan of the audiobook of Amulet’s Rapture narrated by Kristen James. An excerpt from the review is as follows: “The audio version of Amulet’s Rapture is a fascinating listen. The narrator absolutely nails tone, character changes, and emphasis. In addition, the particularly intense scenes in which Catrin is being threatened are completely captivating when read by the narrator, Kristen James. What would be moving moments if read in paperback or Kindle become quite terrifying and extremely uncomfortable.” when listening to the narrator’s interpretation of the text–the story is truly brought to life.

LITERARY TITAN

Amulet's Rapture: Curse of Clansmen and Kings, Book 3

Catrin is living a nightmare. She has become a slave, is used and abused as a woman disguised as a soldier, and the love of her life doesn’t remember the passion that once existed between them. Catrin is as feared as much as she is taken for granted. Considered to have powers that far outshine the abilities and skills of any soldier, she is allowed to live and protected even though she isn’t respected. Marcellus, her love, now under the spell of another, can’t quite shake the feeling that something is not right–something he can’t explain but leaves him feeling empty and broken. Catrin knows, but will she be able to tell him in time?

Amulet’s Rapture, by Linnea Turner, continues the journey of young Catrin. Her life, very different from that of previous installments, is a daily struggle for survival. She is only allowed to live because she is…

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Brigit and the Cailleach by Christine Irving

The following is a reblog of a post entitled, “Brigit and the Cailleach by Christine Irving,” which is an old tale from Scotland that explains how winter becomes spring. Cailleach is another name for the Hag – the archetypal Crone. She represents winter. Brigit is the forever Maiden and stands for spring. These myths are handed through generations of countless bards and storytellers which add their own layers to the story. Please enjoy!

Today, I bring you an old old story from Scotland.  It explains how and why winter became spring.   Cailleach is another name for the Hag – the archetypal Crone.  She represents winter. Brigit is the forever Maiden and stands for spring.  There are many ways to spell her name, all of them correct.  Ben Nevis is a mountain in Scotland and the word bairns means “babies”.

It’s always important to remember that myths come to us through retellings by countless bards and storytellers.  They are layered one on top of the other like palimpsests and sometimes appear contradictory.  I think of stories- particularly the ones who have existed for millennia as three-dimensional puzzles to be slowly played with and unlocked in increments.  Furthermore, what we see and hear in a story means different things to us at different times and circumstances.  There is always something new to be gleaned.

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Queen Mebd: Wolf-Queen – Goddess of Sovereignty

The following is a reblog of a post entitled, “Queen Mebd: Wolf-Queen – Goddess of Sovereignty” by by ZTEVETEVANS on June 3, 2020. Queen Mebd is one of my favorite characters in Irish mythology. She is the archetypal ambitious and strong-willed warrior-queen who knew how to get what she wanted. She was described as a lusty fair-haired wolf-queen who was so beautiful men were robbed of two-thirds of their valor on seeing her. What a combination of trains! Please enjoy reading.

Under the influence!

Queen Mebd: Wolf-Queen

In Irish mythology Queen Mebd is a colorful character –  an archetypal warrior-queen – ambitious and strong-willed, who knew her own mind  and how to get what she wanted.  She was described as a lusty fair haired wolf-queen who was so beautiful men were robbed of two thirds of their valor on seeing her (1).  Probably her best known role is the instigator of the Cattle Raid of Cooley or Táin Bó Cúailnge which she undertook with her husband Aillil during a more congenial time in their relationship. Presented here is a brief glimpse of the roles Mebd filled as wife, queen and goddess of sovereignty, looking her most famous exploit, The Cattle Raid of Cooley and finally her death.

Husbands and Marriage

During the Ulster Cycle in Irish mythology she was a…

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Forests and Water in Roman Empire

The following is a reblog from Environment and Society that highlights the pressures that the Roman Empire had in order to supply basic needs to its populations. Not only does the post provide interesting historical information, its a warning to the modern-day civilization about the consequences of depleting resources such as forests. If we do not learn from the past we might repeat it.

Environment and Society

If we do not learn from the past we might repeat it.

Deforestation during the Roman period was a result of the geographical expansion of the Roman Empire, with its increased population, large-scale agriculture, and unprecedented economic development. Roman expansion marks the transition in the Mediterranean from prehistory (around 1,000 BC) to the historical period beginning around 500 BC. Earth sustained a few million people 8,000 years ago and was still fundamentally pristine, but Rome drove human development in Western Europe and was a leading contributor of the deforestation around the Mediterranean.

A measure of Roman civilization was availability of water.

Roman Water Carriers – Aqueducts: The Romans are renowned for engineering marvels, among which is the aqueduct that carried water for many miles in order to provide a crowded urban population with relatively safe, potable water, as well as less essential but very Roman aquatic uses. Rome had nine…

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Development of Patriarchy in Sumer

The following is a blog posted on October 8, 2013 by ellie wilson at Heartwell Productions in which the question is asked: have humans always been organized in patriarchal societies? Or has there ever been another model of human interaction? And if so, when and why and how did it change? Many books have been written on this topic, some fanciful and almost mythological in their naïveté, but others from a thoroughly researched and scholarly perspective. The following discusses the evidence that women have had equal roles in ancient civilizations.

Heartwell Productions

Ever since the beginning of women’s studies, a major question has been: when did all this male dominance begin? Have humans always been organized in patriarchal societies? Or has there ever been another model of human interaction? And if so, when and why and how did it change? Many books have been written on this topic, some fanciful and almost mythological in their naïveté, but others from a thoroughly researched and scholarly perspective.

For a while, the notion was popular that there was once a time when females ruled. People imagined a past when the “great Mother Goddess” was worshipped, and females were held in awe for our mysterious power to reproduce and to bleed without dying. These were the days when societies were set up with female rulers, the fantasy went, when only women could be priests, when, in fact, men were sometimes sacrificed in the cause of fertility.

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