Vortigern’s Rule: The Treachery of the Long Knives

The following is a NOVEMBER 15, 2017 post by ZTEVETEVANS
Vortigern’s Rule: The Treachery of the Long Knives. The is about the
legendary event of the Saxons’ ambush on the unsuspecting British King Vortigern and his chieftains by the Saxon mercenary leader Hengist in the 5th century at a banquet. The event led up to the legend of Merlin and King Arthur.

Under the influence!

The_murder_of_Raymond_Trencavel

By Noel Sylvestre (1847-1915) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Treachery and Betrayal

The Treachery of the Long Knives was a legendary event that was allegedly inflicted upon the unsuspecting British King Vortigern and his chieftains by the Saxon mercenary leader Hengist in the 5th century.  It was seen as a supreme act of treachery and betrayal by the Britons and is mentioned in the 6th-century work Historia Brittonum attributed to Nennius.   Later Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century in his work Historia Regum Britanniae (The History of the Kings of Britain) presents a slightly different version.  The work presented here is drawn from both versions.

Hengist and Horsa

The legend tells how after Vortigern had usurped the crown of Britain he turned to the Saxons led by the brothers Hengist and Horsa for help in fighting the Picts and Gaels who were ravaging his kingdom. The Saxons proved…

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Corruption, sex and St. Paul

The following post by Australian author, Luciana Cavalarro, immediately caught my attention: Corruption, sex and St. Paul. In preparation of the the release of her 2nd book in the series, “The Labyrinthine Journey”, Luciana provides a travel log of all of the places where her modern day hero and time traveler will continue his odyssey to ancient civilizations.

In this post, we learn more about Corinth and why the Greek city was considered corrupt and immoral. The 2nd book in the series promises to be even more epic that the first and full of adventure and love.

Hope you enjoy!

Eternal Atlantis

After leaving Messene, Evan and his companions head north towards the Corinthian Gulf. However, the trip wasn’t without a few incidents: an altercation with a Mycenaean princess and her ignoble father, and a sword fight with brigands, in which Evan was seriously injured. In any case, the group eventually arrive in Corinth, a city St. Paul in 51CE, had preached to and pleaded Christian unity. Why did St. Paul go to Corinth? Aside from stamping out “paganism” and converting pagans to Christianity, Corinth was considered a sinful city.

Apollo Temple has been built in Doric style on the ruins of earlier temple, being a good example of peripteral temple, supported by 38 columns, only 7 of which are still in place.
By Chris Oxford at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44688121

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Are you able to help me?

Below is a reblog of Eternal Atlantis by Luciana Cavallaro, Author of Historical Fiction/ Fantasy, who I am supporting in the launch of the Labyrinthine Journey, book 2 in the Servant of the Gods series. I thoroughly enjoyed her first book, Search for the Golden Serpent, about the modern day hero and time traveler Evan who is whisked back to Ancient times. Luciana is a talented author which I encourage you to support the launch of her next epic book.

Eternal Atlantis

Hi wonderful readers and supporters of my blog,

I am reaching out for help and support in the promotion of my upcoming book launch. A number of weeks back, I wrote a blog post about the publication of my book The Labyrinthine Journey, book 2 in the Servant of the Gods series.

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Starting Point

Below is a reblog of a post by Luciana Cavallaro​ regarding the start of a series of posts about the Ancient Mycenaean Civilization. She is writing a #HistoricalFiction #Mythology series of time travel and a hero’s journey in the the Servant of the Gods series. I’ve read the first book which I gave 5 of 5 stars on Goodreads: Search for the Golden Serpent. I’m eagerly waiting for the next book in the the epic mythological odyssey.

Please enjoy!

Hope you enjoy.

Eternal Atlantis

To begin the new series, we are starting at the city of Pylos, from where the characters resume their search for the sacred relics of the Mother Goddess.

The ancient site of Pylos was a Mycenaean city in southern Greece, established in the bronze-age, circa 1,300 BCE. Its location on the western coast in the Peloponnese, facing the Ionian Sea and the Italian coast, enabled the city to become a trading port.

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►Mythology: “Dogs in Several Myths” 🐕 / “Collaboration with Brenda Davis Harsham” 💫.-

The following is a reblog of Mythology: “Dogs in Several Myths” posted by Aquileana on 7/11/17 in Collaboration with Brenda Davis Harsham” It is fascinating that the strong bond between humankind and dogs have existed throughout time.

Hope you enjoy!

La Audacia de Aquiles

Mythology: “Dogs in Several Myths”🐕:

“Collaboration with Brenda Davis Harsham💫”

Artemis & Dog. Roman copy of the 1st cent. CE after a Greek original, 4th cent. BCE. Rome, Vatican Museums.

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Introduction:

The dog is the first domesticated animal, and is symbolically associated with loyalty and vigilance, often acting as guardian and protector. Dogs are portrayed as guides and companions, hence the notion of “man’s best friend.”

Dogs almost always appear in a positive light. Native American legends generally portray the dog as the symbol of friendship and loyalty. The Joshua Athapascans believe that dogs were the first beings made by their creator-figure, Xowala’ci. The Jicarilla Apache, on the other hand, tell the story of God Black Hactcin, who first created a dog and then made man as a companion for the dog.  

In Irish Mythology, dogs were the traditional guardian animals of roads and crossways…

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Apollo’s Raven

Below is a reblog from Literary Titan that provided an in-depth review of my historical fantasy, Apollo’s Raven, and gave it 5 stars.

LITERARY TITAN

Apollo's Raven by [Tanner, Linnea]

When a historical fantasy grips you from the very first page, you know you are in for an excellent read. With Apollo’s Raven by Linnea Tanner, we are brought into the world of the not-so-distant past when Rome set their sights on Britannia. We follow the experience of our protagonist Celtic princess Catrin and her star-crossed Roman lover, Marcellus. On opposing sides of a battle that grows fiercer with every passing day. There is more to this tale than love and war for magic and mysticism are part of the lifeblood of our characters. This is more than a tale of might and magic. This is also a tale of a woman coming into her own as a powerful warrior and a strong mystic. Catrin has faced uncertainty and hardship even within her own family. When pitted against the Roman Empire will she find the strength she needs to survive?

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► “Hermes & Writing in Ancient Greece”: “Collaboration with Alan Severs”✍️.-

This is a reblog from La Audacia de Aquiles by Aquileana in collaboration with Alan Severs posted on May 29th. The article adeptly weaves the similarities between the Egyptian, Greek, and Norse gods together who equate writing with magic. Many of the concepts in the ancient civilizations are relevant today and modern day religions. Who would have thought that replacing oral traditions with memory would be so controversial. Yet now, computers are replacing traditional writing. Enjoy the informative and thought-provoking post.

La Audacia de Aquiles

► “Hermes & Writing in Ancient Greece”: “Collaboration with Alan Severs”✍️:

Statue of Hermes/Mercury. Roman copy. 200 AD.


Summary:

“Hermes”, by W. B. Richmond. From “The magazine of art” vol. 9, 1886.

♠Divided into three sections, this article revolves around three main themes: Hermes, as The Greek God of Writing and his equivalents in other cultures; Plato´s derogatory ideas of writing, amidst the prevailing Oral Tradition; and how this eventually would change, as writing became a most accepted form, when the Greeks adopted the Phoenician Alphabet.

Greek God Hermes was the equivalent of the egyptian God Thoth, and from both of them resulted a Hybrid God: Hermes Trismegistus.

Hermes´roman counterpart was Mercury

In Norse Mythology, his Homologous figure was Odin.

Hermes and his associated figures are described in the first section.

♠The second section refers to Plato´s dialogue “Phaedrus”,

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