Quest for Catrin: Photographic Adventure—Celtic Spiritual Warrior (Part 4)


!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js”;fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,”script”,”twitter-wjs”);

Quest for Catrin: Photographic Adventure—Celtic Spiritual Warrior (Part 4)

On his first expedition to Britain in 55 BC, Julius Caesar wrote in Conquest of Gaul the following description of the coastal white cliffs: “…on his approach the whole line of hills crowned with the armed forces of the enemy. There was so little space between the sea and the rising wall of rock, that the shore was easily commanded by any spear thrown from above.”

 

White Cliffs Overview Britain

Coastal White Cliffs Britain

The final challenge in the photographic shoot for transforming my eleven-year-old granddaughter into Catrin, the Celtic spiritual warrior in the historical epic fantasy, APOLLO’S RAVEN, was to provide a realistic backdrop of the hillsides leading up to the white cliffs along the British Channel. The adventure is set in 24 AD Ancient Britain where the army of Catrin’s father battles with Roman who have allied with his Celtic rivals in their plan to overtake his kingdom.

Hillside White Cliffs Britain

White Cliffs Hillside Britain

Rome’s Influence on Ancient Britain

Although Caesar mounted two expeditions to Britain in 55-54 BC, Rome did not invade and occupy this island until 43 AD. Even so, coins minted after Caesar’s expeditions suggest Rome heavily influenced the process of establishing dynasties in the two most powerful tribes in southeast Britain. Establishing loyal client-kingdoms outside the areas under Rome’s direct control was standard foreign policy. Celtic client kings may have spent their youth growing up in aristocratic Roman circles to learn the Roman culture and even to gain experience in the Roman army. In addition, there is archaeological evidence of extensive trading between Britain and the Continent as early as 100 BC.

Although the narrowest point between the Strait of Dover is only 21 miles between Britain and France (Roman Gaul), the logistics of moving soldiers, cavalry, and supplies proved to be a formidable task. Invasion of Britain was a high priority for Augustus, but other crises in the Empire may have influenced his decision not to invade. The Roman historian, Tacitus, records that in 16 AD some Roman soldiers were cast ashore in Britain and promptly returned to Rome by a local ruler.

Wildflower Hillside White Cliffs Britain

White Cliffs Hillside Britain

The above historical assumptions of Rome’s influence on the political climate in Ancient Britain set the backdrop to APOLLOS’ RAVEN.

Photographic Challenge – Setting

The photographer, Rebekah West [Rebekah West Photography and Creative International; Website: http://rebekahwest.com] had to find a suitable location in Boulder that looked similar to the grassy and forested landscape of the white cliffs’ hillsides. The British coastline is known for encroaching fog while in Colorado most days are arid and sunny. Further complicating the shoot, Colorado had a severe drought. Throughout Colorado, several forest fires raged, creating a smoky haze along the front range.

Celtic Spiritual Warrior

Celtic woman warrior in sword fight

The final location of the shoot was Fairview High School situated next to open space in Boulder. The school building served as the backdrop for a stone fortress while the open space provided a grassy hillside and groves of trees.

Celtic Spiritual Warrior on White Cliffs

Celtic Spiritual Warrior

 

On the evening of the photographic shoot, the air cleared and the approaching sunset provided fabulous lighting for the photographs.

Celtic Woman Warrior in Battle

Celtic Woman Warrior in Battle

(To be continued—Quest for Catrin: Photographic Adventure)

References:

“The Conquest of Gaul,” Julius Caesar; translated by F. P. Long; The Barnes and Noble Library of Essential Reading, 2005, pg. 94.

“AD 43 The Roman Invasion of Britain,” John Manley; Tempus Publishing, Inc., 2002.

Heroine Mythological Adventure

//

Introduction

Linnea Tanner is a native of Colorado where she attended the University of Colorado and earned her BA and MS in chemistry. After working in the pharmaceutical industry, she is now an aspiring writer of historical fantasy, romance, and adventure based on her lifelong passion for Ancient Rome, Celtic Britain, and mythology.

 

Life Venture of Linnea Tanner

As a child, Linnea was an avid reader of Greek/Roman/Nordic mythology which opened up a new world of gods/goddesses, heroes, and mythological adventure.  Using this fantastical world as a base, Linnea imagined herself as a heroine warrior on a perilous odyssey to overcome nearly insurmountable obstacles. Other characters joined Linnea on this journey, including Romans, who taught her about courage, love, duty, loyalty, and sacrifice. Yet most schools taught history and mythology in the biased viewpoint of male conquerors; women were invisible in the background.

Linnea’s childhood characters stayed with her as she began her life venture: marriage to her soul mate, birth of two children, education, and professional career. However, she rediscovered the wonder of the goddess mythology from ancient civilizations where women and men worked in partnership (“The Chalice & the Blade” by Riane Eisler). She was inspired by accounts of Celtic women warriors and rulers, and extensive research and expeditions to the UK and France. In the Celtic warrior society, the rights and status of women far exceeded those of the patriarchal societies of Greece and Rome. During her travels to the UK, Linnea’s passion for writing was ignited after she researched the historical account of the Celtic queen Boudica, whose rebellion almost resulted in the withdrawal of all Roman forces from Britain in 60 AD.

Vision of Celtic Spirit Chronicles

Linnea Tanner has taken the next step in her next life’s adventure of becoming a writer. She envisions completing the Spirit Warrior Chronicles, an epic historical fantasy set in 1st Century Celtic Britain prior to the Roman invasion in 43 AD. The story is about the heroine, Catrin—a Celtic spirit warrior destined to meet the great grandson of Marc Antony (Marcellus) and to become a warrior queen in her tribal kingdom.

The first two unpublished novels of the Spirit Warrior Chronicles are:

  • APOLLO’S RAVEN is set in 24 AD when Catrin begins a perilous odyssey that starts in Celtic Britain (modern day Kent) where she meets Marcellus; ventures into Gaul (modern day France) where she becomes a gladiatrix; and ends in Rome where she reunites and falls in love with Marcellus.
  • RAVEN’S FIRE continues the odyssey where Catrin must take on the dark powers of her raven spirit to fulfill her destiny to become warrior queen. The draft of this manuscript is near completion.

Purpose of Apollo’s Raven Blog

Linnea has begun this blog to share and to survey the opinions of others regarding ancient Celtic and Roman culture and mythology. In addition, she will share some of her research findings and photographs of sites in Britain (ancient Roman Britannia) and France (ancient Roman Gaul) where the heroine, Catrin, travels in her odyssey.