Q & A with Linnea Tanner

Introduction

It is with great pleasure to share my interview with Luciana Cavallero, an Australian Author and Historian, that was recently posted on her website. If you click below, you will find out more about what inspired me to write Apollo’s Raven.

Q & A with Linnea Tanner

Come and meet Linnea Tanner in an interview about her debut book Apollo’s Raven. In her novel, Linnea Tanner weaves Celtic tales of love, magic, adventure, betrayal and intrigue into historical fiction set in Ancient Rome and Britannia. (Click here to go to the interview)

Update Apollo’s Raven Release April 10

Update Apollo’s Raven Release April 10

Exciting news! The first book in the Apollo’s Raven series will be released on April 10th. The historical fiction/epic fantasy fulfills my lifelong dream to publish a story based on a character I first imagined as a child.

Catrin, Celtic Warrior Princess

You can pre-order the paperback (ISBN 978-0-9982300-0-9), the e-book ISBN (978-0-9982300-2-3), and the special edition hardcover book (ISBN 978-0-9982300-1-6) at http://amzn.to/2nQLHhC.

The following video book trailer is a glimpse of the upcoming release of Apollo’s Raven https://youtu.be/fRUBJa-e_1o

About Apollo’s Raven Series

The Apollo’s Raven series weaves historical fiction into an epic Celtic tale of love, magic, adventure, intrigue and betrayal. The series follows two star-crossed lovers in the backdrop of Ancient Rome and Britannia spanning from 24 AD through 40 AD. The Apollo’s Raven epic series is inspired by the legacy of Cleopatra and Mark Antony, but with a Celtic twist. The heroine is based on historical accounts and mythology of Celtic warrior queens. Her Roman lover is the great-grandson of Mark Antony. The vastly different cultures of the empire-building Romans and the mystical Celts in Britannia set the backdrop to the series.

Important Update on Blog and New Website

It had been my intention to integrate this blog into my new author website at http://linneatanner.com. However, the integration posed unexpected challenges, as several of the links to images were disconnected. Due to the issues, I’ve decided to maintain Apollo’s Raven as a separate blog and will work over the next few months to fix the links to the missing images.

I cherish the friendship and interactions that I’ve had with subscribers to Apollo’s Raven. For those who are not subscribers to my new website, click on the link below and fill out the form to subscribe. You will receive free the first three chapters of Book 1 of the Apollo’s Raven series.

CLICK HERE: http://linneatanner.com/newsletter/

Subscribers to my new website will also receive periodic newsletters and notifications of new posts on my blog and media buzz. The blog at my author site and Apollo’s Raven will continuing highlighting my ongoing research, book reviews, and author interviews. This summer, I plan to travel to the United Kingdom and will give on-the-spot reports on sites I visit and new discoveries.

Subscribers to my new author website will be notified of special offers and giveaways that are planned for May 2017.

Thank you for following me on my journey.

Best wishes,
Linnea Tanner

Apollo’s Raven Coming Soon

 

APOLLO’S RAVEN on the Horizon

New exciting changes are on the horizon for the APOLLO’S RAVEN series and a new website. In the next few weeks, the current website will transition to an author website in anticipation for the release of the first book, APOLLO’S RAVEN.

The two blogs maintained for APOLLO’S RAVEN will be melded into one blog on the new website. Topics on the new blog will include my research and travels to sites described in the books, author interviews, and other topics of interest to readers. The new site will provide the latest news on the release of my books, events I will be attending, and a reader’s guide that can be used in book clubs.

My journey for writing the APOLLO’S RAVEN series began in 2010. My blog went live on January 4th, 2012. I’ve met wonderful authors, writers, friends, and readers who have been very supportive. The photographs of the Celtic Warrior Princess Catrin which inspired me were taken by my friend and photographer, Rebekah West.

Celtic Spiritual Warrior

Celtic Warrior Princess Catrin

I’ve also met roadblocks. But constructive feedback from authors, writers and agents prompted me to re-envision the APOLLO’S RAVEN series as historical fiction that weaves epic Celtic tales of love, magic, adventure, intrigue and betrayal in Ancient Rome and Britannia.

Overview White Cliffs Britain

White Cliffs Southeast Britannia

The first book of the series is set in 24 AD Britannia, where the magical world of the Celtic tribal kingdoms is explored. The historical backdrop of the epic story is based on new archaeological findings that strongly suggest that Rome not only had strong political influence, but also a military presence in southeast Britannia. The political situation is similar to Egypt under the rule of Cleopatra.

APOLLO’S RAVEN will ultimately be available in print, e-book, and audio format. It has now been formatted for print and is undergoing final proofing. The release date will be announced soon after the new website goes live in the next couple of weeks.

I invite you to take an adventure into the vastly different worlds of Ancient Rome and Britannia, where Celtic tales are inspired.

What happens when forbidden love and loyalty create a tangled web of deception?

The Celtic Warrior Princess Catrin is swept into a political web of deception when the Emperor Tiberius demands allegiance from her father, King Amren.

Celtic Woman Warrior Prepares for Battle

Celtic Warrior Princess Catrin

Catrin is drawn by the magnetic pull she feels for Marcellus, the great-grandson of Mark Antony, who is caught under the shadow of his scandalous forefathers. When King Amren takes Marcellus as a hostage, he demands that she spy on him. As she falls in love, she discovers a curse that foretells a future she desperately wants to break.

Torn between her forbidden love for the enemy and loyalty to her people, Caitlin urgently calls upon the magic of the Ancient Druids to alter the dark prophecy that awaits her.

Celtic Woman Warrior Summons Raven Spirit

Catrin Summons Magic of Ancient Druids

Will she save her lover? Will her father succumb to the Emperor? Discover the truth in APOLLO’S RAVEN.

Claudius Roman Invasion Britain

Emperor Claudius Credited with Roman Conquest of Britain

Emperor Claudius Credited with Roman Conquest of Britain

“Claudius undertook, in all, one expedition and that one was of no great extent. When he was granted triumphal ornaments by decree of the Senate, he thought that the title was not weighty enough to grace the imperial magistracy and craved the distinction of a proper triumph.”
—Suetonius, Life of Claudius.


Claudius Roman Invasion Britain

Ancestral Legacy of Claudius

Emperor Claudius is credited for the Roman invasion of Britain in 43AD. He was the first emperor born outside of Italy in Lugdunum (Lyon, France). As the son of Drusus and Antonia Minor, he emphasized his right to rule as a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

Cameo of Claudius Cabinet des Médailles

Cameo of Claudius Cabinet des Médailles

Claudius was also the grandson of Mark Antony, whose marriage to Octavia (Octavian’s sister) resulted in the birth of two daughters, one being Claudius’ mother. Shortly after Antony’s defeat and death in 30 BC, Octavian declared his rival’s birthday, 14 January, as nefastus (unholy). Of note, Claudius’ father also had the same birthday on January 14—a day no public business could be transacted in Rome.

Octavian also convinced the Senator to damn Antony’s memory forever (damnatio memoriae). By discrediting Antony, Octavian hoped to elevate his standing as Emperor Augustus in history. It took Claudius, almost one hundred years later, to restore Antony’s memory

Bust of Mark Antony

Bust of Mark Antony

Not only did Claudius restore the memory of Antony, he also needed a conquest which he could earn a triumph to legitimize his rule against potential usurpers. Suetonius dismissed the Roman invasion of Britain by Claudius as of no great importance. “Claudius decided that Britain was the country where a real triumph could be most readily earned. Its conquest had not been attempted since the days of Julius Caesar. The Britons were now threatening vengeance because the Romans had refused to return some fugitives.”

The written account of the Roman invasion of Britain in 43AD is primarily based on Cassius Dio’s “Roman History.” Unfortunately, his account gives very little detail about the campaign. The only resistance the Romans encountered was the forces led by Caratacus and Togodumnus, the anti-Roman sons of Cunobelin from the Catuvellauni tribe.

 

Britain_WEB_SIZED_INK[1]

Opportunity for a Triumph

In 41AD, Caratacus strategically positioned himself in Silchester, so he could thrust westward to grasp the lands of the Dobunni and of the Atrebates, ruled by the elderly Verica. Verica fled to Rome seeking help from Claudius to stop the aggression. Caratacus and Togodumnus countered by arrogantly demanding that Claudius return their pro-Roman brother, Adminius, and Verica to Britain. Their demand instead triggered the emperor’s decision to send four legions to settle the political differences. Claudius would later use this as a propaganda tool to convince the Senate that he deserved a triumph for conquering Britain—a task left undone by his great ancestor Julius Caesar.

Bust of Emperor Claudius

Bust of Emperor Claudius

The Britons must have been misled to believe that Rome’s only intent was to provide legions for peace-keeping. Most tribes that felt the expansionist weight of the Catuvellani had no reason to resist the Romans. The Atrebates viewed the empire as their saviors.

No Initial Resistance

In the summer of 43AD, the Roman legions led by Plautius did not encounter any British resistance after they landed. They had to search for the troublemakers, Caratacus and Togodumnus.

Possible Landing Richborough Roman Fort at Sandwich, Kent

Possible Roman Landing Site Richborough Roman Fort in Kent

The first battle took place at a river that many believed was the Medway in Kent. Armed Britons waited for the Romans on the other side of the waterway that had no bridge. Plautius sent some auxiliaries, who were accustomed to swimming in full armor, across the waterway to wound the horses that drove the British war chariots.

Celtic Chariot

Celtic War Chariot in Britain

Soon after, Flavius Vespasian crossed the river with his troops and surprised the Britons. The ensuing battle lasted for two days until reinforcements from another Roman legion proved the turning point.

The British warriors then retreated to the River Thames, possibly the Tidal Pool of London, east of the Tower Bridges. After some more fighting, Plautius stopped his advancement and sent for Claudius to lead the final charge. By this time, Togodumnus had died from injuries suffered from battle.

Roman Infantryman in Ancient Britain

Roman Infantryman

Claudius’ Final Victory

Extensive preparation had already been made in advance of Claudius’ arrival. Various types of equipment, including elephants, were gathered to support the emperor’s final charge into battle.

Roman and Celtic Shields Used in Ancient Britain

Roman and Celtic Shields Used in Ancient Britain

Claudius arrived at the Thames toward the end of summer. He crossed the river, defeated the enemy, and captured Camulodunum (Colchester). Cassius Dio says, “He won over many people, some by diplomacy, some by force of arms. He confiscated the weapons of these peoples and handed the tribes over to Plautius, and left him with orders to subdue the remaining regions.”

Claudius depicted as the Roman god Jupiter

Claudius depicted as the Roman god Jupiter

Claudius was in Britain for only sixteen days to achieve his glorious victory. He rushed back to Rome for his triumph and accolades. The inscription dated 52AD on the Arch Claudius in Rome was dedicated by the Senate and the People of Rome in recognition of Claudius receiving the submission of eleven kings without loss. The phrase “without loss” confirms Suetonius’ account that British princes submitted without battle or bloodshed to the emperor in Colchester.

Linnea at Roman Wall at Colchester

Linnea at Roman Wall at Colchester

Conclusions

It is now theorized that Rome culminated the processes of subjugating at least southeast Britain and of bringing that area under its complete control before 43AD. Viewed in this light, the Claudius’ campaign in 43AD was not a military invasion, but rather a political annexation of an already ‘Romanized” region.

Celtic Tribal Territories in Southern Britain

Celtic Tribal Territories in Southwest Britain

The primary evidence leading to this conclusion is as follows:

  1. Archaeological findings suggest the region was populated with increasing multiple cultures with different ethic identities and languages between the time of Caesar and Claudius.
  2. Children and other close relatives of indigenous rulers in Britain were educated in Rome. There was a growing practice that British kings first sought recognition from Rome when they took control of a region. Augustus also personally appointed client kings.
  3. There are increasing hints from archaeological sites that Roman soldiers were present in Britain before 43 AD. Orthogonal structures, more typical of Roman architecture, have been discovered near Colchester and the Fishbourne Palace.
Replica of a Dining Room at Fishbourne Palace

Replica of a Dining Room at Fishbourne Palace

There was precedence of Romans stationing legions beyond the formal frontier of the empire’s rule. Julius Caesar stationed three to four legions with Cleopatra after he restored her to the throne in 47 AD. Feel free to comment on whether you believe the theory that the invasion of Britain was nothing more than a ploy by Claudius to legitimize his role as the Roman emperor.

Julius Caesar Statue

Statue of Julius Caesar

References

  1. John Manley, AD 43 The Roman Invasion of Britain: A reassessment; Tempus Publishing, Inc., Charleston, SC, 2002.
  2. Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus, The Twelve Caesars, Translated by Robert Graves; Reprinted 2007 by Penguin Books, New York.
  3. Graham Webster, Roman Invasion of Britain, Reprinted 1999 by Routledge, London.
  4. Graham Webster, Rome Against Caratacus: The Roman Campaigns in Britain AD 48-58; Reprinted 2002 by Routledge, London.
  5. Graham Webster, Boudica: The British Revolt against Rome AD 60; Reprinted 2004 by Routledge, London.
  6. Cassius Dio, Roman History, published in Vol. VII of the Loeb Classical Library, Edition 1924; Book LX   http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Cassius_Dio/60*.html

Coming Soon!

My website is undergoing development in anticipation of the launch of my epic historical fantasy, APOLLO’S RAVEN, next year. The next series of posts will focus on the historical background and themes in the upcoming series.

Apollo's Raven Book Cover Under Development

Apollo’s Raven Book Cover (Historical Fantasy)

The concept of what constitutes a heroine’s journey for the main character of Catrin, a Celtic warrior princess, will be discussed. Mark Antony—the inspiration for Marcellus, Catrin’s lover—will be explored in a new light.

Celtic Warrior Princess

Catrin, Celtic Warrior Princess Summons Raven

Please join me on my journey of discovering how history and mythology can relate to each one of us today.