Elen of the Hosts: Goddess of Sovereignty, King Maker, Warrior Queen of the Britons

Introduction Elen of the Hosts

The following is a reblog of a post entitled, Elen of the Hosts: Goddess of Sovereignty, King Maker, Warrior Queen of the Britons
This article was first published #FolkloreThursday.com as British Legends: Elen of the Hosts – Saint, Warrior Queen, Goddess of Sovereignty on 21/06/2018 by zteve t evans

Historically, Elen of the Hosts was a real woman who lived in the 4th century, but in British legend and Welsh and Celtic mythology, may go back even further. She appears to have been a woman of many roles that have grown and evolved over the centuries to the present day.

Today, Elen is best known for her part as the subject of the affections of the emperor of Rome in the strange tale of The Dream of Macsen Wledig, from the Mabinogion. The story depicts her as a mysterious,  powerful woman who knows how to gets what she wants and appears linked to the giving and taking of sovereignty. The post discusses who Elen was and how she has changed and evolved over the centuries.

One of the most interesting abilities Elen possessed was the power of the dream. There are many arguments about the purpose of the dream, and what follows is a modern idea of how many people view the dream and Elen. Many people today see the dream that Macsen experienced as more than an ordinary dream. The lucidity of the dream makes it more of an out of body experience or form of astral projection rather than an ordinary dream. In Celtic and Irish tradition this kind of experience is known as an aisling, which is a kind of dream that supplies a strong spiritual message to the dreamer. The purpose of the dream experienced by Macsen appears to have been to draw him from Rome to Elen in Britain.

Under the influence!

This article was first published #FolkloreThursday.com as British Legends: Elen of the Hosts – Saint, Warrior Queen, Goddess of Sovereignty on 21/06/2018 by zteve t evans

fantasy-3629943_1920 Image by kellepicsPixabayCC0 Creative Commons

Elen of the Dream

Historically, Elen of the Hosts was a real woman who lived in the 4th century, but in British legend and Welsh and Celtic mythology, may go back even further.  She appears to have been a woman of many roles that have grown and evolved over the centuries to the present day. Today, Elen is best known for her part as the subject of the affections of the emperor of Rome in strange tale of The Dream of Macsen Wledig, from the Mabinogion. The story depicts her as a mysterious woman of power who knows how to gets what she wants and appears linked to the giving and taking of…

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From the Mabinogion: The Dream of Macsen Wledig

This is a reblog of a post written by ZTEVETEVANS on APRIL 18, 2018 This article was first published on #FolkloreThursday.com 30/11/2017, titled British Legends: The Mabinogion – The Dream of Macsen Wledig which is taken from the British Legend of Mabinogion: The Dream of Macsen Wledig templars_chess_libro-de-los-juegos_alfons-x

Under the influence!

templars_chess_libro-de-los-juegos_alfons-x Public Domain Image  – Source

This was article was first published on #FolkloreThursday.com 30/11/2017,  titled British Legends: The Mabinogion – The Dream of Macsen Wledig written by zteve t evans.

British Legends:  The Mabinogion – The Dream of Macsen Wledig

The Dream of Macsen Wledig from the Mabinogion tells the story of how the Emperor of Rome experienced a dream in which he traveled to Wales, then met and became obsessed with a beautiful maiden named Elen. It is a story telling of a mythical past with legendary heroes involved in extraordinary adventures, that many people feel resonates today. The tales were created from traditional and existing works, using both written and oral sources, and were not original works. They were often reworked to reflect current issues, and are seen by many as an interpretation of a mythical past age while also providing an interpretation of the present. Presented here…

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