Apollo’s Raven

Below is a reblog from Literary Titan that provided an in-depth review of my historical fantasy, Apollo’s Raven, and gave it 5 stars.

LITERARY TITAN

Apollo's Raven by [Tanner, Linnea]

When a historical fantasy grips you from the very first page, you know you are in for an excellent read. With Apollo’s Raven by Linnea Tanner, we are brought into the world of the not-so-distant past when Rome set their sights on Britannia. We follow the experience of our protagonist Celtic princess Catrin and her star-crossed Roman lover, Marcellus. On opposing sides of a battle that grows fiercer with every passing day. There is more to this tale than love and war for magic and mysticism are part of the lifeblood of our characters. This is more than a tale of might and magic. This is also a tale of a woman coming into her own as a powerful warrior and a strong mystic. Catrin has faced uncertainty and hardship even within her own family. When pitted against the Roman Empire will she find the strength she needs to survive?

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Author Interview Paul Schumacher

INTRODUCTION

It is my pleasure to introduce Paul Schumacher, Colorado author of the debut novel, The Tattered Box. I first met Paul a couple years ago in a writing workshop sponsored by the Northern Colorado Writers and was moved by his heartfelt and poignant writing style in another story.

During the day, he works as an electrical engineer and at night, fits his writing into an active lifestyle with his wife, three children, and two cats. I’m honored that I had an opportunity to learn more about Paul and the background to his debut novel. Below is my interview of Paul.

Paul Schumacher Head Shot

Paul Schumacher, Author, The Tattered Box

INTERVIEW

Tell me about your latest book, The Tattered Box.

It’s a story about a grandson who travels back in time to hang out with his grandpa. Initially, he’s doubtful of his grandpa’s never-ending stories, and frankly doesn’t even believe some of them happened. But then he’s granted this wonderful opportunity to experience them firsthand. Through his experiences, he learns to love and appreciate his grandpa for who he really is. Much of the story is told through innocent items in a raggedy old box from his grandpa.

What inspired you to write a story about the relationship between a grandfather and grandson and the memories they share? Are these characters based on people you know?

The day before my father-in-law passed away, I was taking my then 13-year-old son to school. We were reminiscing about his grandpa, and he said something that really struck me. He wondered how cool it would be to somehow go back in time and hang out with his grandpa. Not only was his grandpa a fun-loving storyteller, he also loved his sports: baseball, bowling, golf, or anything with a ball. My son figured they’d be the best of friends, if only he was somehow granted that wish. Writing this book was one way to fulfill that.

Once I heard my son’s comment and started crafting a storyline in my head, I was hooked. I simply had to share it with the world. I started writing down many of my father-in-law’s stories and eventually fashioned them into a complete novel. Thus much of the book is based on real events. It became a not-so-gentle reminder to me (and hopefully others who read it) that time is short, and I need to learn to better appreciate my fleeting moments with others. Make the most of life! We never know how much time we have left.

Is there a special item in the tattered box that evoked a personal memory for you?

Probably the muddy ball. The story of the ball, which is told in the first chapter, is based almost entirely on a true story that I heard many times from my father-in-law. Every time I read that chapter, it’s like he’s sitting next to me telling me the story. The elaborate hand motions, the strong fluctuations in his voice, the glimmer in his eye as he reveals the punchline. I can see it all.

Have you received reactions/feedback to your work that has surprised you? In what way?

I’ve heard so many wonderful stories from people who reminisce about their own grandparents. Most have such wonderful memories of getting to know loved ones who lived in an entirely different era. Like a complex jigsaw puzzle, attempting to decipher the life and times of someone you barely relate to. Many also had regrets: if only they’d asked more questions. If only they’d spent more time with them.

Specifically, one of my favorite feedbacks was from someone who had an elderly parent who lived far away. As she finished the book, she felt inspired to fly out and visit with her ailing father. Spending time with him while she still could. I felt honored that I played a role in that.

Are you currently working on another book? What are your projects for the near future?

My second novel is a story of secrets and redemption. The working title is I Wish I Had Known and is partly based on some of my own life experiences. It’s about a teenager who mentors some boys younger than him, and he also falls in love with a young woman along the way. But there’s a darker side. He needs to learn to forgive the drunk driver who killed his father, and others need to forgive him for his past missteps. I continued with the inter-generational aspect of The Tattered Box that I find so fascinating. I guarantee you’ll love the ending!

Are you an avid reader? Which books are your favorite ones? Which books inspire you?

I’ve always loved reading, and my list of books is always quite diverse. I read everything from classics to murder mysteries to Christian non-fiction. Lots of topics can capture my attention, and I always enjoy learning from the opinions and writings of others. As far as favorite books, the two that come to mind are A Prayer for Owen Meany and The Jesus I Never Knew. I laugh as I write this as those two books alone are very different, but they have both taught me (in their own unique way) to be a better person and writer.

What is your life like outside of writing?

My family is very important to me. We spend a lot of time doing fun stuff like golf, tennis, watching movies, playing games, or just hanging out. Of course, like all modern families, my kids are involved in their fair share of activities and sports, and I play the role of the proud spectator. My life isn’t about me, and I’m perfectly fine with that. I also fit in work when I can to pay for it all. I’m an electrical engineer by day, husband, father, and author by night.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

This might sound funny, but the first one that comes to mind was a sand wedge I received from my brother when I was a teenager. He filled a shoe box with sand, placed a ball on top, and included a ‘coupon’ for a sand wedge which I desperately wanted at the time. Maybe it was its uniqueness or its presentation, but that Christmas was one of my favorites.

What might we be surprised to know about you?

I certainly don’t look like one, but I used to be an avid runner. I actually completed a marathon a long time ago, a badge of honor I’m darn proud of. I also used to bike a lot, and finished eight MS 150 bike tours (yes, they’re 150 miles).

What simple pleasure makes you smile?

Writing. In my sunroom, on my deck, in a coffee shop. Wherever I find inspiration, that’s where I am. Writing is such a creative process and is such a dramatic shift from the analytical tasks I perform at work. A blank page with no rules on what to say next is pretty exciting to me.

CONTACT PAUL SCHUMACHER

You can contact Paul at the following sites:

Twitter
Facebook
Goodreads

You can purchase his printed book and e-book at Amazon

Book Review: The Tattered Box

Book Review: The Tattered Box 

Below is my Goodreads book review: The Tattered Box by Paul Schumacher, a Colorado author.

The Tattered BoxThe Tattered Box by Paul Schumacher
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Tattered Box by Paul Schumacher is a memorable coming of age story of John, a young man coming to grips that his own father left him when he was a young boy. However, his elderly grandfather Bill leaves him a tattered box full of items evoking memories of his past. After John is hit by a baseball and knocked unconscious, he mysteriously time travels to 1941 when he again meets his grandfather as a young man the same age as him. It is as if the past, present, and future join into one time. All of the items in the tattered box are still left intact at the beginning of John’s journey in the past. As he adjusts to the pre-WWII culture, he becomes friends with his grandfather whom he fondly calls Bill and shares the moments that the items in the tattered box represent. By learning more about his grandfather, John learns about himself and the importance that memories have for the future.

This is a beautifully written story that is multi-layered with rich symbolism. One of the more poignant scenes is when John and Bill observe an eagle protecting their helpless eaglets in the nest. John comments, “Their father would teach them everything he knew, then suddenly push them out of the nest, forcing them to flap their wings in one death-defying leap.” This is a pivotal scene that will tie into the heartfelt ending, leaving a visual memory that will forever be embedded in a reader’s mind. I highly recommend this book for the rich message it offers that moments of the past, present, and future co-exist between generations.

View all my reviews

Cover Image Apollo's Raven

Thunderclap Apollo’s Raven Flying High Deal!

Thunderclap Apollo’s Raven Flying High Deal!

Thank you to all who supported me on my Thunderclap Apollo’s Raven Flying High Deal that offers the e-book for 99 cents at Amazon on June 6th.

Only one day to go! For those who have not yet participated, could you help me reach my goal of 100 supporters? Just click: Soar with Apollo’s Raven Deal! You’ll be taken to my Thunderclap page where you can click on which Social Media format you would like to post the e-book deal for Apollo’s Raven.

That’s it. Thunderclap will automatically post for you on June 6th. More information on what Thunderclap is and instructions on how it works is provided below.

What is ThunderClap?

Social media is a powerful tool that helps you to engage with other people. It becomes even more powerful when several people post at the same time. That is where Thunderclap comes in. Instead of having your message now and then on Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr, the Thunderclap campaign focuses the effect. Thunderclap will publish the same post on your social media at the very same time as other supporters. This is an effective way to get the message out to as many people as possible. Aggregating the posts helps break through the “noise” of general news.

How to Support My Thunderclap

To participate in my Thunderclap campaign, here are the steps:

  • By clicking the link above (Soar with Apollo’s Raven Deal!), you will be directed to a page on Thunderclap.
  • Once there, you can become a supporter of my Thunderclap campaign by clicking one of the social media platforms that you would like to use: Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr. See example screenshot below.

    Step 1 Thunderclap Choose Social Media

  •  The default message that Thunderclap will automatically post on your social media on June 6 is provided in the box at the top. See example  screen shot below.

    Step 2 Thunderclap

     

  • To get the special offer, click http://thndr.me/jaBxsu in the message box. You will be taken to a special page on my website where you can click to get the Apollo’s Raven e-book for 99 cents at Amazon.
  • In addition to the e-book deal, you can sign up to get a free bonus article on Ancient Celtic history. And further, you’ll also be entered into a random drawing for a free copy of the limited hard cover edition of Apollo’s Raven.

May Giveaway Winners Announced!

Congratulations to subscribers who won the May Giveaways:

Grand Prize Hand-crafted Book Stand: Fay Johnson (Below is a photo of Fay who graciously sent me a picture of herself with the book stand and Apollo’s Raven book)

Fay Johnson, Grand Prize May Giveaway

Limited Hard Cover Edition of Apollo’s Raven: Gary Dolman (UK Author)

e-book Apollo’s Raven: Janet Cardoza

Photographs of People Reading Apollo’s Raven:

Below are photographs of people who are reading Apollo’s Raven. If you have a photograph with the Apollo’s Raven book, feel free to e-mail it to me at linnea@linneatanner.com and I’ll post it on my blog.

Skye Griffith Reading Apollo’s Raven

Todd Marshall Holding Apollo’s Raven Books

Sonja Brucklacher with Apollo’s Raven

Kristin James, Narrator of Apollo’s Raven audio-book

Anita Meiss with Apollo’s Raven Book

Joni Petrizzo & Linnea Tanner Holding Apollo’s Raven at Johnson’s Corner

APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT . . .
Thank you for helping to get the word out about my debut novel, Apollo’s Raven. My goal as an author is to connect with authors and readers who love both historical fiction and fantasy. I am looking for new ways to connect with readers that are most engaging.

Thank you for helping me on my first Thunderclap campaign!


Best wishes,
Linnea Tanner

► “Hermes & Writing in Ancient Greece”: “Collaboration with Alan Severs”✍️.-

This is a reblog from La Audacia de Aquiles by Aquileana in collaboration with Alan Severs posted on May 29th. The article adeptly weaves the similarities between the Egyptian, Greek, and Norse gods together who equate writing with magic. Many of the concepts in the ancient civilizations are relevant today and modern day religions. Who would have thought that replacing oral traditions with memory would be so controversial. Yet now, computers are replacing traditional writing. Enjoy the informative and thought-provoking post.

La Audacia de Aquiles

► “Hermes & Writing in Ancient Greece”: “Collaboration with Alan Severs”✍️:

Statue of Hermes/Mercury. Roman copy. 200 AD.


Summary:

“Hermes”, by W. B. Richmond. From “The magazine of art” vol. 9, 1886.

♠Divided into three sections, this article revolves around three main themes: Hermes, as The Greek God of Writing and his equivalents in other cultures; Plato´s derogatory ideas of writing, amidst the prevailing Oral Tradition; and how this eventually would change, as writing became a most accepted form, when the Greeks adopted the Phoenician Alphabet.

Greek God Hermes was the equivalent of the egyptian God Thoth, and from both of them resulted a Hybrid God: Hermes Trismegistus.

Hermes´roman counterpart was Mercury

In Norse Mythology, his Homologous figure was Odin.

Hermes and his associated figures are described in the first section.

♠The second section refers to Plato´s dialogue “Phaedrus”,

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Cover Image Apollo's Raven

Apollo’s Raven Audio Book Newly Released

Apollo’s Raven Audio Book Newly Released!

Exciting News! The audio-book of Apollo’s Raven was just released! It is a historical fantasy weaving an epic Celtic tale of love, magic, adventure, intrigue, and betrayal in the backdrop of Ancient Rome and Britannia.

Get it free if you join the Amazon Audibles 30-day trial. After 30 days, Audibles is $14.95 per month to download other Audio Books, but you can cancel at any time. Click on Amazon to take advantage of this special offer now!

Below is an excerpt of the audio-book before the climatic prisoner exchange to give you a tidbit and flavor of the Audio Book.  Click below to listen.

Kristin James, Narrator

I’m flying high with the quality of the narration by Kristin “KJ” James. She adeptly captures the voices of both the Celtic and Roman characters in Apollo’s Raven. It has been a real pleasure to collaborate with this talented narrator from the Nashville, TN area.

Kristin James, Narrator, Apollo’s Raven

Acting has always been KJ’s passion. Starting on the stage as early as preschool, she pursued her passion into college where she received a BA in Communication with a double emphasis in Theatre and Public Relations from Mississippi State University. After college she found herself more and more drawn to voice overs. Several classes, coaching sessions, seminars, research, and a closet-turned-studio later, she now records and produces Audio Books on a regular basis. She has also done several radio commercials for clients such as Advance Financial, TriStar Health, and GAC.

When she’s not recording in her booth, you’ll find her crocheting, playing video games, or running agility with her dogs. Learn more about KJ at her websiteFacebook and Twitter.

Winners of May Giveaways to be Announced

The winners of the May Giveaways for subscribing to my author website are as follows:

Fay Johnson – Handcrafted Book Stand

Gary Dolman – Signed Special Hard Cover Edition of Apollo’s Raven

Janet Cardoza – Amazon Kindle e-book of Apollo’s Raven

Apollo’s Raven May Deals Continue

The e-book of Apollo’s Raven will be reduced from $4.99 to 99 cents from May 30 to June 6 at Amazon.

Thank you for joining me on this journey.

Best wishes,
Linnea Tanner

 

 

Teaching Ancient Civilisations

The following is a reblog of a post by Luciana Cavalarro regarding her experiences with teaching ancient civilisations and how the past can teach us lessons in modern day. As always, her posts are thought-provoking.
Enjoy!

Eternal Atlantis

I am currently teaching Ancient Civilisations, which is great, and a subject I love. So far, we’ve covered Origins of Man, to which one of my students commented it should be Origins of Humankind, and she’s right, and hence that’s how we refer to it in class now. It was interesting to see the reaction from the class when it was discussed we came from one location 70,000 years ago. It made for a lively discussion.

Spartan Warriors Wikipedia

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